Sam Altman on Loving Community, Hating Coworking, and the Hunt for Talent

Conversations with Tyler | 27 February 2019 | 1h 08m | Listen Later | iTunes
Wide-ranging conversation with Sam Altman of Y Combinator. Insights on what it takes to be a successful founder and how to pick founders. Also covers AI, Napoleon, nuclear energy, the Industrial Revolution, coworking spaces, trading off UBI and immigration, and much more.

Irish Questions

Analysis | 25 February 2019 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
Edward Stourton sets out the long history of Irish political, social, cultural and economic issues influencing and shaping UK politics. Covers the Acts of Union in 1800, the Catholic Emancipation in the 1820s, the 1840s Irish potato famine, Catholic clerical education, the campaign for Home Rule leading ultimately to the War of Irish Independence in the twentieth century and the bloody establishment of the Irish Free State, as well as the Troubles and the Good Friday Agreement in 1998. Considers what lessons these episodes may hold for today’s Westminster politicians and how to imagine the Anglo-Irish future.

Alex Danco – Scarcity, Abundance and Bubbles

Invest Like the Best | 12 February 2019 | 1h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Alex Danco of VC firm Social Capital. Insights and fresh perspectives on business models, cities, the history and future of transportation, the shift from products to functions, and the rise, fall and usefulness of asset bubbles.

Wesley Yang – The Souls of Yellow Folk

Think Again – a Big Think Podcast | 1 December 2018 | 0h 56m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Wesley Yang, author of The Souls of Yellow Folk. Describes the cultural invisibility of Asian-Americans: neither black nor white, tasting the frustrations of both, but denied the entitlement of either. Uses the Asian-American experience to explore racial gaslighting and microaggressions, concluding that the cure is more dangerous than the disease. Suggests that the liberal institutions that let us live together in peace are vulnerable to political correctness.

Medieval Warrior Queen

History Extra | 21 February 2019 | 0h 30m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Catherine Hanley, author of Matilda: Empress, Queen, Warrior. Tells the story of Empress Matilda, the daughter of Henry I, whose battle with Stephen for the English throne in the 12th century became known as ‘the anarchy’. Suggests Matilda wielded power more effectively than acknowledged by period chroniclers unable to accept a woman as ruler.

Fungi

In Our Time | 15 February 2018 | 0h 48m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Discusses fungi: organisms which are not plants or animals but a kingdom of their own. The millions of species of fungi play a crucial role in ecosystems, enabling plants to obtain nutrients and causing material to decay. Without fungi, life as we know it simply would not exist. They also make possible the production of bread, wine and certain antibiotics.

The Future of Meat

Freakonomics Radio | 14 February 2019 | 0h 51m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs. Will reconciling these two forces be possible — or, even better, Impossible™?

Catherine Semcer on Poaching, Preserves, and African Wildlife

EconTalk | 18 February 2019 | 1h 07m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Catherine Semcer drawing on her background in African wildlife conservation. Discusses the role of incentives in preserving wildlife in Africa and, counter-intuitively, how allowing limited hunting of big game has improved both habitat and wildlife populations while reducing poaching.