The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, by Thomas Kuhn

Context with Brad Harris | 24 July 2018 | 0h 24m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Discusses the ideas in Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, a classic in the history of science, and one of the most cited books of the twentieth century. Kuhn challenged our assumptions about how science works, but his opaque style ignited a cultural movement energized around the misinterpretations that objective truth was an illusion and that scientific progress was just a conceit of western civilization. These ideas became pillars of postmodernism, and no one was more frustrated by the folly of their development than Thomas Kuhn himself.

Bethany McLean – Business Gone Bad and the Art of Persistence

Invest like the best | 25 July 2018 | 0h 57m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with business journalist Bethany McLean who has covered many interesting stories in business and investing, including Enron (which became the famous book and documentary, the Smartest Guys in the Room), SAC Capital, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the great financial crisis, and most recently, fracking and the energy revolution. Includes a fascinating contrast of the socialism of US housing finance alongside private health care, with the private housing finance and socialised health care of most Western countries.

Beyond the Politics of Race

Making Sense with Sam Harris | 29 July 2018 | 1h 56m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Coleman Hughes about race, racism, and identity politics. Challenges progressive instincts with thoughtful, nuanced thinking, grounded in data.

Simon Winchester on the Pacific

The World in Time / Lapham’s Quarterly | 1 August 2018 | 0h 39m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Simon Winchester about his book Pacific: Silicon Chips and Surfboards, Coral Reefs and Atom Bombs, Brutal Dictators, Fading Empires, and the Coming Collision of the World’s Superpowers. Winchester is quite the raconteur, with delicious anecdotes on US nuclear testing and policing Pitcairn Island.

How Insights from Ancient DNA are Upending Paleontology

FT Tech Tonic | 17 April 2018 | 0h 21m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with David Reich about the ideas in his book Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past. Covers how the genomic revolution is affecting paleontology and changing many of our preconceptions about the mixing of human groups in human pre-history.

How to Disagree Better

The Ezra Klein Show | 16 July 2018 | 1h 38m | Listen Later  | iTunes
“Contempt is the conviction of the utter worthlessness of another person. Anger leads to reconciliation, contempt to permanent enmity.” Interview with Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute, an America think tank. Discusses how to disagree better, why civility shouldn’t be the goal in conversation, why it’s healthy to have a lot of arguments, and why anger is a healthy emotion and contempt isn’t.

Richard Haier – The Neuroscience of Intelligence

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast | 4 June 2018 | 1h 25m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Discussion with Richard Haier about the ideas in his book The Neuroscience of Intelligence. Covers the history of the politically-charged debate about intelligence. Research points to genetics playing a more important role than environment as intelligence develops from childhood. Intelligence test scores correspond strongly to specific features of the brain assessed with neuroimaging.

Tali Sharot – Optimism, Decision Making, and Mistakes

Capital Allocators | 4 June 2018 | 0h 47m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Tali Sharot, an expert on human decision-making, optimism and emotion and author of The Influential Mind, The Science of Optimism, and The Optimism Bias. Sharot combines research in psychology, behavioural economics and neuroscience to reveal the forces that shape our decisions, beliefs and inaccurate expectations of the future.