Amazon Narratives: Memos, Working Backwards from Release, More

a16z | 8 February 2021 | 1h 03m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Colin Bryar and Bill Carr about their book Working Backwards: Insights, Stories, and Secrets from Inside Amazon. Shares inside stories behind AWS, Kindle and Prime along with the leadership principles, decision-making practices, and operational processes that delivered them. Discusses lean MVP; the internal API economy; whether you need a chief product officer; coordination as a business grows; the power of narratives; and more.

What the Science of Relationships Can Teach Founders

Venture Stories | 4 February 2021 | 0h 44m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Logan Ury discussing her book How To Not Die Alone from the perspective of founder relationships. Discusses: why a great relationship is really just a culmination of a series of small decisions, and how to be intentional every step of the way; how the three dating tendencies apply to cofounders as well as to romantic partners; what leads to external CEO candidates being paid more but performing worse than internal ones; why life is happier for satisficers than for maximizers; when to end it versus when to mend it; and why people love optionality but are much happier after having made permanent decisions.

Yuen Yuen Ang – China’s Gilded Age

New Books in Economics | 18 December 2020 | 0h 44m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Yuen Yuen Ang about her book China’s Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom and Vast Corruption. Defines four types of corruption: petty theft, grand theft, speed money, and access money, Explains that not all types of corruption carry the same harm and have the same impact on growth. Overviews research on corruption and argues that countries that appear free of corruption are just characterized by more sophisticated forms of corruption.

Brian Dumaine: What Does Bezonomics Tell Us About the Future of Labor?

Keen On | 10 July 2020 | 0h 27m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Brian Dumaine about his book Bezonomics: How Amazon Is Changing Our Lives and What the World’s Best Companies Are Learning from It. Unpacks the elements of Amazon’s success – customer obsession, extreme innovation, and long-term management, all supported by artificial intelligence.

Matt Ridley: Rational Optimism

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast | 31 January 2021 | 1h 34m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Matt Ridley about ideas from his books The Origins of Virtue, The Rational Optimist, and How Innovation Works. Discusses economic optimism, trade through the reciprocity of nations, enlightened self-interest, how virtue relates to trade, feeding nine billion people, the triumphs of cities, escape of Malthusian population trap, and more.

Benjamin Friedman on the Origins of Economic Belief

Conversations with Tyler | 27 January 2021 | 1h 07m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Benjamin Friedman about ideas from his book Religion and the Rise of Capitalism. Argues that contrary to the popular belief that Western economic ideas are a secular product of the Enlightenment, instead they are the result of hotly debated theological questions within the English-speaking Protestant world of thinkers like Adam Smith and David Hume. Discusses the connection between religious belief and support for markets, what drives varying cultural commitments to capitalism, why the rate of growth is key to sustaining liberal values, why Paul Volcker is underrated, why annuities don’t work better, America’s debt and fiscal sustainability, his critiques of nominal GDP targeting, why he wouldn’t change the governance of the Fed, how he maintains his motivation to keep learning, and more.

Sowell on Economic Facts and Fallacies

EconTalk | 28 February 2008 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Thomas Sowell about the ideas in his book Economic Facts and Fallacies. Discusses the misleading nature of measured income inequality, CEO pay, why nations grow or stay poor, the role of intellectuals and experts in designing public policy, and immigration.

How Much Do We Really Care About Children?

Freakonomics Radio | 14 January 2021 | 0h 47m | Listen Later | iTunes
Explores child car seats as an example of a counter-productive policy intended to benefit children. Covers the downturn in fertility implied by COVID-19 economic downturn and the demographic challenges that implies; the reduction in fertility attributable to child car seat regulation; and the questionable benefits of child car seats.