Janet Golden on Babies Made Us Modern

EconTalk | 4 June 2018 | 1h 03m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with historian Janet Golden about her book, “Babies Made Us Modern,” about the transformation of parenting in the first half of the 20th century. It’s a fascinating story of how our knowledge of infant health and behaviour grew dramatically but remains imperfect. Includes lots of anecdotes about past parenting practices.

Jim O’Shaughnessy – Premeditated Success

Invest Like the Best | 21 March 2017 | 1h 05m | Listen Later  | iTunes
The host interviews his father, an earlier pioneer at quantitatively evaluating factor investment techniques. It’s strong on that: but O’Shaughnessy inspires with his example of how to lead a good life and be a good parent.

Barbara Coloroso – Kids Are Worth It

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish | 30 October 2018 | 2h 03m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Barbara Coloroso, author of the parenting classic “Kids Are Worth It.” Coloroso shares her foundational principles of child-rearing, how to get kids to be accountable for their actions, and what we can do as parents to raise confident, happy children.

Alison Gopnik on Parenting and the Downsides of Modernity

Rationally Speaking | 30 April 2018 | 1h 03m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik explains why modern parenting is too goal-oriented. Discusses whether anything parents do matters, whether kids should go to school, and how kids learn discipline if you don’t force them to do things.

Kinder-Gardening

Hidden Brain | 12 December 2017 | 0h 29m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with psychologist Alison Gopnik, author of “The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children.” Many parents think they can shape their child into a particular kind of adult, like a carpentry project. But Gopnik explains why it’s more realistic to see parenting as akin to gardening, where you create the best conditions, without any promises on the outcomes. Includes astonishing insight that both children and AI robots learn more about an item’s functionality if they play with it rather than being taught.