Dylan Matthews on What to Conclude from Falling Global Poverty

Rationally Speaking | 28 May 2019 | 1h 17m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Dylan Matthews, author of the article Bill Gates tweeted out a chart and sparked a huge debate about global poverty. Carefully evaluates the debate between people like psychologist Steven Pinker and anthropologist Jason Hickel over how to interpret the falling global poverty rate and the contribution of capitalism.

Women in the 1960s

History Extra | 23 May 2019 | 0h 35m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with social historian Virginia Nicholson about her book How Was It For You?: Women, Love, Sex and Power in the 1960s. Explores how some of the radical changes of the decade shaped the lives of women from different backgrounds.

Doris Kearns Goodwin on Presidential Leadership

Spectator Books | 5 December 2018 | 0h 32m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with historian Doris Kearns Goodwin about her book Leadership: In Turbulent Times. Compares and draws lessons from Lincoln, two Roosevelts and LBJ. Replete with memorable anecdotes to help the leadership lessons sink in.

Marilyn Waring: Still Counting the Value of Women’s Unpaid Work

RNZ: Sunday Morning | 15 December 2018 | 0h 22m | Listen Later
Interview with former NZ politician Marilyn Waring about her books Counting for Nothing and Still Counting. Waring argues that the economy relies on women’s unpaid work and the environment, yet this is ignored and undervalued by conventional economic measures. She lays out a vision for what a new, genuinely transformative economic measure would look like.

Bruce Bueno de Mesquita on Democracies and Dictatorships

EconTalk | 12 February 2007 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Bruce Bueno de Mesquita about the incentives facing dictators and democratic leaders. Both face competition from rivals and try to please their constituents and cronies to stay in power. He applies his ‘selectorate’ framing to foreign aid, the Middle East, Venezuela, the potential for China’s evolution to a more democratic system, and Cuba. Along the way, he explains why true democracy is more than just elections – it depends crucially on freedom of assembly and freedom of the press.

Michael Ignatieff on Human Rights, Liberalism, & Ordinary Virtues

Carnegie Council Audio | 22 April 2019 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with human rights scholar, educator, and former politician Michael Ignatieff about the ideas in his book The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World. Discusses what he calls “the ordinary virtues,” such as patience and tolerance; the status of human rights today the dilemmas of migration; and the essential criteria for true democracy.

Tyler Cowen on Big Business

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis | 10 May 2019 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Tyler Cowen about his book Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero. Covers why we love to hate big business, whether American corporations are monopolistic, whether CEOs are overpaid, and whether Big Tech is a threat to democracy.

How to Fix Student-Loan Debt

Freakonomics Radio | 9 May 2019 | 0h 48m | Listen Later | iTunes
The cost of a university has skyrocketed, creating a debt burden that’s a drag on the economy. A possible solution is to shift the risk of debt away from students and onto investors looking for a cut of the graduates’ earning power. Explores university education, how to fund it, and politics more generally with Mitch Daniels, the President of Purdue University.