England’s Galileo: the Life and Discoveries of Thomas Harriot

Late Night Live – with Phillip Adams ABC RN | 17 July 2019 | 0h 24m | Listen Later
Interview with Robyn Arianrhod about her book Thomas Harriot: A Life in Science, which resurrects Thomas Harriot’s reputation and acknowledges his place in the canon of scientific luminaries.

Nir Eyal on Indistractable

The Ezra Klein Show | 1 August 2019 | 1h 19m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Nir Eyal about ideas in his book Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life. Debates whether big tech is addictive and whether good discipline suffices to manage digital distraction.

What If Our Ignorance Outgrows Our Potential?

Context with Brad Harris | 5 August 2019 | 0h 35m | Listen Later | iTunes
What happens when rich and powerful societies lose their wisdom and forget what made them great in the first place? Backgrounds the rediscovery after thousands of years of Lucretius’s modern sounding On the Nature of Things. (As told in Stephen Greenblatt’s book The Swerve: How the World Became Modern.) Draws lessons for today from how a paradise of wisdom was once lost.

Andy Matuschak on Books and Learning

EconTalk | 7 August 2019 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Andy Matuschak about his essay Why Books Don’t Work. Matuschak argues that most books rely on transmissionism, the idea that an author can share an idea in print and the reader will absorb it. And yet after reading a non-fiction book, most readers will struggle to remember any of the ideas in the book. Matuschak argues for a different approach to transmitting ideas via the web including different ways that authors or teachers can test for understanding that will increase the chances of retention and mastery of complex ideas.

Scott Galloway on The Algebra of Happiness

The Jordan Harbinger Show | 28 May 2019 | 1h 12m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Scott Galloway, professor at NYU Stern School of Business, and the author of The Algebra of Happiness: Notes on the Pursuit of Success, Love, and Meaning.

Jon Day on Homing

The Book Club | 24 July 2019 | 0h 34m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jon Day, author of Homing: On Pigeons, Dwellings and Why We Return. A fascinating look into the world of racing pigeons. Reflects on what pigeons tell us about the relationship between humans and animals and about the idea of home.

Cracking the Code of Love

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish | 23 July 2019 | 2h 03m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Sue Johnson, a clinical psychologist and the developer of EFT or Emotionally Focused Therapy. Discusses ideas from her books about how to create, protect, and nourish fulfilling sexual and emotional relationships.

The Secret History of the Future: Unreliable Evidence

Economist Radio | 17 July 2019 | 0h 27m | Listen Later | iTunes
In the early 20th century a new forensic technique—fingerprinting—displaced a cruder form of identification based on body measurements. Hailed as modern, scientific, and infallible, fingerprinting was adopted around the world. But in recent years doubts have been cast on its reliability, and a new technique—DNA profiling—has emerged as the forensic gold standard. In assuming it is infallible, are we making the same mistake again?