Andy Matuschak on Books and Learning

EconTalk | 7 August 2019 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Andy Matuschak about his essay Why Books Don’t Work. Matuschak argues that most books rely on transmissionism, the idea that an author can share an idea in print and the reader will absorb it. And yet after reading a non-fiction book, most readers will struggle to remember any of the ideas in the book. Matuschak argues for a different approach to transmitting ideas via the web including different ways that authors or teachers can test for understanding that will increase the chances of retention and mastery of complex ideas.

Scott Galloway on The Algebra of Happiness

The Jordan Harbinger Show | 28 May 2019 | 1h 12m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Scott Galloway, professor at NYU Stern School of Business, and the author of The Algebra of Happiness: Notes on the Pursuit of Success, Love, and Meaning.

Jon Day on Homing

Spectator Books | 24 July 2019 | 0h 34m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jon Day, author of Homing: On Pigeons, Dwellings and Why We Return. A fascinating look into the world of racing pigeons. Reflects on what pigeons tell us about the relationship between humans and animals and about the idea of home.

Cracking the Code of Love

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish | 23 July 2019 | 2h 03m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Sue Johnson, a clinical psychologist and the developer of EFT or Emotionally Focused Therapy. Discusses ideas from her books about how to create, protect, and nourish fulfilling sexual and emotional relationships.

The Secret History of the Future: Unreliable Evidence

Economist Radio | 17 July 2019 | 0h 27m | Listen Later | iTunes
In the early 20th century a new forensic technique—fingerprinting—displaced a cruder form of identification based on body measurements. Hailed as modern, scientific, and infallible, fingerprinting was adopted around the world. But in recent years doubts have been cast on its reliability, and a new technique—DNA profiling—has emerged as the forensic gold standard. In assuming it is infallible, are we making the same mistake again?

Should We Kill Elephants to Save Them?

Beyond Today | 13 June 2019 | 0h 19m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Alastair Leathead, the BBC’s Africa correspondent. Explores whether allowing the hunting of some (endangered) elephants allows many more to be saved.

William Hazelgrove on Wright Brothers, Wrong Story

Thecuriousmanspodcast | 19 March 2019 | 1h 03m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with William Hazelgrove about his book Wright Brothers, Wrong Story: How Wilbur Wright Solved the Problem of Manned Flight. Discusses the evidence from archival material that it was Wilbur, rather than Orville and Wilbur, that was the mastermind behind the first powered flight.

Leeuwenhoek: the Fabric Seller Who Discovered Bacteria

The Forum | 18 July 2019 | 0h 39m | Listen Later | iTunes
Tells the story of Antonie van Leeuwenhoek who was the first to observe bacteria and other microscopic lifeforms that couldn’t be seen by the naked eye. He is now regarded as the father of microbiology and yet he had neither scientific training nor university education, and spent his life first as a linen merchant and then a civil servant in a small Dutch city.