Adam Gopnik on The Moral Adventure of Liberalism

Carnegie Council Audio | 22 May 2019 | 0h 58m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Adam Gopnik about the ideas in his book A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism. Argues that rather than emphasizing the role of the individual, the principles of community and compromise are at the core of the liberal project.

Women in the 1960s

History Extra | 23 May 2019 | 0h 35m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with social historian Virginia Nicholson about her book How Was It For You?: Women, Love, Sex and Power in the 1960s. Explores how some of the radical changes of the decade shaped the lives of women from different backgrounds.

23andMe (and You, and Everyone Else)

Freakonomics Radio | 16 May 2019 | 0h 49m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Anne Wojcicki, founder and CEO of 23andMe discussing the revolution in home DNA testing, which gives consumers important, possibly life-changing information. It’s also building a gigantic database that could lead to medical breakthroughs. But how will you deal with upsetting news? What if your privacy is compromised? And are you prepared to have your DNA monetized?

The Magic Shoebox

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis | 14 May 2019 | 0h 57m | Listen Later | iTunes
The last of Michael Lewis’s excellent series on fairness. Reprises the story in Flash Boys, about the New York Stock Exchange profiting by unfairly advantaging high-frequency traders, and the people who have set up IEX to provide a fair market.

Tyler Cowen on Big Business

Political Economy with James Pethokoukis | 10 May 2019 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Tyler Cowen about his book Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero. Covers why we love to hate big business, whether American corporations are monopolistic, whether CEOs are overpaid, and whether Big Tech is a threat to democracy.

Thoreau: The Writer Who Went to the Woods

The Forum | 9 May 2019 | 0h 39m | Listen Later | iTunes
Explores the life and legacy of the American thinker Henry David Thoreau and his famous work Walden, which describes the Thoreau’s experiment in living simply at Walden Pond in Massachusetts in the 1840s. Walden offers insights into work and leisure, nature, solitude, society, the good life and more. Discusses Walden and his essay Civil Disobedience, and reflects on the legacy of Thoreau’s work.

Forget Me Not: Starting a New Romance When Your Partner Has Dementia

RNZ: Insight | 11 May 2019 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
What if your beloved has dementia and doesn’t know who you are anymore? Is it all right to start a new relationship with someone else? Considers the tangle of emotions, family reaction and legal issues that can emerge.

Why Are Even Women Biased Against Women?

Analysis | 29 January 2018 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
Women are sexist too. Even avowed feminists are found to be unconsciously biased against women when they take ‘implicit association’ tests. Explores where these discriminatory attitudes come from and what we can do about them.