Education 4o: How AI Will Revolutionize the Way We Learn

The Next Big Idea | 30 May 2024 | 1h 07m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Sal Khan about his book Brave New Words: How AI Will Revolutionize Education (and Why That’s a Good Thing). Outlines the bright future for AI in education, with a personalised tutor for all, based in part on his experience developing Khanmigo for Khan Academy.

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The Buddha and His World

Tides of History | 7 March 2024 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Patrick Wyman discusses the life and times of The Buddha – born Siddartha Gautama. Considers what we can know about the Buddha’s world and how it shaped him and his message.

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Cedric Chin – Accelerating Business Expertise

Infinite Loops | 14 March 2024 | 1h 26m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Cedric Chin about Commoncog, his newsletter dedicated to finding useful, practical ways to accelerate business expertise. Discusses some of the most potentially transformative concepts he’s uncovered: the business expertise triad, quality engineering and process control, the effectiveness of naturalistic decision-making, expectancy, intuition and investing, how to stay open-minded, trial & error, knowledge shields & the power of reading, and protocols & pattern-matching.

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Confucius and His Age

Tides of History | 25 January 2024 | 0h 39m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Patrick Wyman discusses the life and times of Confucius, one of the most famous and influential thinkers in all of human history. Covers who he was, what he believed, what he taught, and how his time and place – the closing years of the Spring and Autumn period – made him what he was.

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Gregory Radick – Disputed Inheritance: The Battle over Mendel and the Future of Biology

The Dissenter | 5 February 2024 | 1h 12m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Gregory Radick about his book Disputed Inheritance: The Battle over Mendel and the Future of Biology. Discusses the inter-relationships between the work of Mendel, Darwin and Francis Galton; the early 20C debate between William Bateson and W. F. R. Weldon about whether Mendelian genetics should be the standard entry point for learning about genes. Argues that if Weldon had lived longer and his view of Mendelian genetics as a special case ignoring environmental effects won out, we would have framed genetics fundamentally differently, with less of a framing of heredity as destiny.

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If Life Is Random, Is It Meaningless? (with Brian Klaas)

EconTalk | 22 January 2024 | 1h 00m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Brian Klaas about his book Fluke: Chance, Chaos, and Why Everything We Do Matters. Cites examples of chance events profoundly shaping both society and individual lifes. Argues that recognizing the randomness of everyday life and history can lead to a newfound appreciation for the meaning of every decision, and to a focus on joyful experimentation instead of relentless optimization.

See also The Prospect Interview about his earlier book Corruptible: Who Gets Power and How It Changes Us

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Francesca Peacock: Pure Wit

The Book Club | 13 September 2023 | 0h 45m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Francesca Peacock about her book Pure Wit: The Revolutionary Life of Margaret Cavendish. Discusses the life and work of 17C writer Margaret Cavendish, her feminist writing before feminism was generally thought of, and her pioneering science fiction.

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Charles King on Gods of the Upper Air

AMSEcast | 1 January 2024 | 0h 38m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Charles King about his book Gods of the Upper Air: How a Circle of Renegade Anthropologists Reinvented Race, Sex, and Gender in the Twentieth Century. Discusses the history of the development of cultural anthropology; key figures like Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, and Zora Neale Hurston; and how they shifted our understanding of societies from being in a hierarchy from primitive to advanced to being relative and based on the history and circumstances of their people.

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