Gary Shiffman on the Economics of Violence

EconTalk | 18 January 2021 | 0h 59m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Gary Shiffman about his book The Economics of Violence: How Behavioral Science Can Transform our View of Crime, Insurgency, and Terrorism. Shiffman argues that we should view terrorism, insurgency, and crime as being less about ideology and more about personal expression and entrepreneurship. He argues that framing these problems with economics gives better tools for fighting them.

Richard Holmes – The Age of Wonder

Bookclub | 9 April 2019 | 0h 34m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Richard Holmes about his book The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science. Describes the scientific ferment that swept through Britain in the late-18th century and tells stories of the celebrated innovators and their great scientific discoveries: from telescopic sight and the discovery of Uranus to Humphrey Davy’s invention of the miner’s safety lamp, and from the first balloon flight to African exploration.

This is one of my wife’s favourite books.

Open: The Story of Human Progress

Cato Daily Podcast | 31 December 2020 | 0h 19m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Johan Norberg about his book Open: The Story of Human Progress. Notwithstanding the backlash against openness in much of the world, Norberg argues that humanity’s embrace of openness is the key to our success.

Amy Stanley on Stranger in the Shogun’s City

New Books Network | 12 November 2020 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Amy Stanley about her biography Stranger in the Shogun’s City: A Japanese Woman and Her World. Discusses the life of Tsuneno, from growing up in a rural community through her escape to the city of Edo, where she lives in the final decades of the Tokugawa Shogunate. Also covers the historical setting and how Tsuneno’s life tells us more about life, especially the life of women, during this period of Japanese history.

Kazakh Famine

Constant Wonder | 4 December 2020 | 0h 52m | Listen Later
Interview with Sarah Cameron about her book The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan. Discusses the Kazakh famine, where the forced resettlement of Kazakh nomads in an effort to collectivize farming resulted in the deaths of over 1.5 million people. Until recently, the Kazakh famine and its repercussions were largely unknown to the West and the Republic of Kazakstan itself.

Women in the Workforce (Over the Very Long Run)

The Economic History Podcast | 5 October 2020 | 0h 55m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jane Humphries about her research on women in the workforce. Discusses the implications of her findings on the nature of women’s work, wages through time, hand spinners’ income, and historical living standards to the role of the European Marriage Pattern, the Black Death, the male breadwinner model, and Engel’s pause to the Industrial Revolution and faster economic growth. Draws on her papers The Wages of Women in England, 1260–1850; Spinning the Industrial Revolution; and Unreal Wages? Real Income and Economic Growth in England, 1260–1850.

Putin’s People with Catherine Belton

Intelligence Squared | 7 July 2020 | 0h 45m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Catherine Belton about her book Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took On the West. Argues that the techniques of front companies, money laundering and links with illegal business and organised crime that he practised working for the KGB in East Germany are the same techniques he uses today to concentrate his power and interfere in Western countries.

Philip Coggan: How Did the World Get So Rich?

Political Economy with Jim Pethokoukis | 18 November 2020 | 0h 27m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Philip Coggan about his book More: A History of the World Economy from the Iron Age to the Information Age. Reflects on the history of the global economy and the lessons we can learn for today. Argues that it is the increased connection between people that resulted in increased trade, specialization, freedom, and ultimately, increased prosperity.