Echolocation

In Our Time | 21 June 2018 | 0h 51m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how some bats, dolphins and other animals emit sounds at high frequencies to explore their environments, rather than sight. Bats that echolocate have a range of frequencies for different purposes and techniques for preventing themselves from becoming deafened by their own sounds. Some prey have evolved ways of detecting when bats are emitting high frequencies in their direction, and some fish have adapted to detect the sounds dolphins use to find them.

How to Catch World Cup Fever

Freakonomics Radio | 14 June 2018 | 0h 56m | Listen Later 
An intriguing backgrounder on the Football World Cup in Russia. “This could be a World Cup of great cacophony. A plague of far-right Nazi-infused UFC-trained Russian fans; English fans for which they’ve built Soviet-style enormous drunk tanks; platoons of horseback-mounted Cossacks with whips; and heroin and cocaine legalised around the stadia. What could possibly go wrong?”

A Polite Word for Liar

Revisionist History| 31 May 2018 | 0h 39m | Listen Later  | iTunes
An early morning raid, a house-full of Nazis, the world’s greatest harmonica player, and a dashingly handsome undercover spy. Part 1 of a two-part exploration of memory and our naïve ideas about what memory is worth. Malcolm Gladwell shows us how we all reimagine the truth – so we cannot treat our memory as gospel. So good you just might listen twice.