Max Kenner on Crime, Education, and the Bard Prison Initiative

EconTalk | 29 March 2021 | 1h 07m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Max Kenner, the founder and executive director of the Bard Prison Initiative, which was profiled in a four-part PBS documentary, College Behind Bars. Discusses the program, which replicates the coursework of students at Bard College to offer college degrees to prisoners. Kenner talks about the origins of the program, what students experience, and the injustice he sees in both the criminal justice system and the educational system in the United States.

Sean Roberts – The War on the Uyghurs

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast | 24 March 2021 | 1h 16m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with The War on the Uyghursabout his book The War on the Uyghurs: China’s Internal Campaign against a Muslim Minority. Explains how China is using the US-led global war on terror to erase and replace Uyghur culture and persecute this ethnic minority in what has become the largest program of mass detention and surveillance in the world.

The British Army in Iraq and Afghanistan

Modern War Institute | 3 March 2021 | 0h 45m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Simon Akam about his book The Changing of the Guard: The British Army Since 9/11. Discusses the British Army’s experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan, its relationships with the US military, and leadership failures. Argues for an honest conversation about those wars, the army’s performance in them, and the relationship between the UK military and the British people.

The 2020s, Economic Growth, and Deep Tech with Eli Dourado

Venture Stories | 23 March 2021 | 0h 53m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Eli Dourado of the Center for Growth and Opportunity discussing why he wants to radically increase GDP per capita and the current bottlenecks to achieving that; why he thinks the 2020s will be the decade of atoms; why amazing scientific breakthroughs like CRISPR haven’t translated into new products or treatments; why he’s excited about geothermal power and how it could change geopolitics if its potential is realized; his breakdown of his position as a technological optimist and cultural pessimist; where he agrees or disagrees with Tyler Cowen, Bryan Caplan, Peter Thiel, and Samuel Hammond; and why entrepreneurs shouldn’t shy away from areas with regulatory risk, since “that’s where all the action happens.”

David Ricardo

In Our Time | 25 March 2021 | 0h 49m | Listen Later | iTunes
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life and work of David Ricardo (1772 -1823). At a time when nations preferred to be self-sufficient, to produce all their own food and manufacture their own goods, and to find markets for export rather than import, Ricardo argued for free trade even with rivals for the benefit of all. He contended that existing economic policy unduly favoured landlords above all others and needed to change, and that nations would be less likely to go to war with their trading partners if they were more reliant on each other.

Voice: You Are What You Speak

The Next Big Idea | 25 March 2021 | 1h 31m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with John Colapinto about his book This Is the Voice. Backgrounds how our voices are our social presence, conveying high-resolution information about such things as our sex, class, background, education and emotional state. Discusses the evolution of deeper male voices, the recent deepening of female voices, and political oratory. Explores the future of audio, arguing that podcast conversations are a higher-bandwidth way of delivering ideas than books.

Matt Ridley: Infinite Innovation

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish | 23 March 2021 | 1h 04m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Matt Ridley discussing writing books about science, the age-old battle between viruses and humans, rational optimism, the difference between innovation and invention, the role of trial and error and the effects of social media on seeing others’ points of view.

Michela Wrong: Do Not Disturb

The Book Club | 24 March 2021 | 0h 43m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Michela Wrong about her book Do Not Disturb: The Story of a Political Murder and an African Regime Gone Bad. While Rwanda’s president Paul Kagame has basked in the approval of Western donors, Michela Wrong argues, his burnished image conceals a history of sadism, repression and violent tyranny. Discusses what our goodies-and-baddies account of Rwanda’s genocide missed, and why it urgently needs correcting.