Primatologist Frans De Waal Explores What Humans Can Learn From Animal Emotions

On Second Thought | 27 August 2019 | 0h 48m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Frans de Waal about his book Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves. Discusses the evidence for animal emotions, how they compare with human emotions, and how this challenges notions of animals as stimulus response machines.

Open: The Story of Human Progress

Cato Daily Podcast | 31 December 2020 | 0h 19m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Johan Norberg about his book Open: The Story of Human Progress. Notwithstanding the backlash against openness in much of the world, Norberg argues that humanity’s embrace of openness is the key to our success.

Amy Stanley on Stranger in the Shogun’s City

New Books Network | 12 November 2020 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Amy Stanley about her biography Stranger in the Shogun’s City: A Japanese Woman and Her World. Discusses the life of Tsuneno, from growing up in a rural community through her escape to the city of Edo, where she lives in the final decades of the Tokugawa Shogunate. Also covers the historical setting and how Tsuneno’s life tells us more about life, especially the life of women, during this period of Japanese history.

Chris Dixon – The Future of Blockchain at a16z

Capital Allocators | 11 January 2021 | 1h 03m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Chris Dixon about his work on Andreesen Horowitz’s Crypto Funds. Covers his early interest in computers and business; lessons from starting companies and angel investing; new computing platforms; the history of centralized and decentralized computing; development of blockchain technologies; potential killer apps; token basics; and investor perception.

Kazakh Famine

Constant Wonder | 4 December 2020 | 0h 52m | Listen Later
Interview with Sarah Cameron about her book The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan. Discusses the Kazakh famine, where the forced resettlement of Kazakh nomads in an effort to collectivize farming resulted in the deaths of over 1.5 million people. Until recently, the Kazakh famine and its repercussions were largely unknown to the West and the Republic of Kazakstan itself.

Women in the Workforce (Over the Very Long Run)

The Economic History Podcast | 5 October 2020 | 0h 55m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jane Humphries about her research on women in the workforce. Discusses the implications of her findings on the nature of women’s work, wages through time, hand spinners’ income, and historical living standards to the role of the European Marriage Pattern, the Black Death, the male breadwinner model, and Engel’s pause to the Industrial Revolution and faster economic growth. Draws on her papers The Wages of Women in England, 1260–1850; Spinning the Industrial Revolution; and Unreal Wages? Real Income and Economic Growth in England, 1260–1850.

Putin’s People with Catherine Belton

Intelligence Squared | 7 July 2020 | 0h 45m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Catherine Belton about her book Putin’s People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took On the West. Argues that the techniques of front companies, money laundering and links with illegal business and organised crime that he practised working for the KGB in East Germany are the same techniques he uses today to concentrate his power and interfere in Western countries.

Vanessa Woods on Bonobo Handshake

Office Hours at Duke University | 19 May 2010 | 0h 56m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Vanessa Woods about her book Bonobo Handshake: A Memoir of Love and Adventure in the Congo. Tells stories from her work researching bonobos at the Lola Ya Bonobo Sanctuary, a refuge for orphaned baby bonobos in the Congo. Describes problem-solving experiments designed to understand how bonobos differ to humans and chimpanzees.