Anne Applebaum: Red Famine

Spectator Books | 21 September 2017 | 0h 24m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Anne Applebaum, author of Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine, which marshalls the evidence that the 1930s famine in Ukraine was intentional.

Is the Protestant Work Ethic Real?

Freakonomics Radio | 6 July 2018 | 0h 40m | Listen Later  | iTunes
In the early 20th century, Max Weber argued that Protestantism created wealth. Finally, there are data to appraise whether he was right. All it took were some missionary experiments in the Philippines and a clever map-matching trick that goes back to 16th-century Germany.

Housing Affordability: Top-Down Design and Spontaneous Order

The Success Project – Development Research Institute | 12 January 2016 | 0h 26m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Alain Bertaud discussing how solutions to creating more affordable housing can arise spontaneously and independent of top-down government planning. Sets out what cities that rely less on planning teach us about the right role for government in improving housing affordability and development overall.

James Robinson on Why Nations Fail

Social Science Bites | 3 December 2018 | 0h 18m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with James Robinson, co-author of Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty. Considers and refutes traditional explanations for the inequality between rich and poor countries. Makes the case for inclusive institutions being critical to creating economic success.

Arnold Kling on The Three Languages of Politics

Cato Daily Podcast | 25 May 2017 | 0h 16m | Listen Later 
Interview with Arnold Kling distilling the framework in The Three Languages of Politics: Talking Across the Political Divides. We should assume good intentions as we talk past each other: with progressives focussed on oppressor versus oppressed; conservatives on civilisation versus barbarism; and libertarians on liberty versus coercion.

Napoleon

Start the Week | 20 October 2014 | 0h 41m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Discusses Napoleon’s impact during his lifetime, in France and across Europe and how much of this remains today. Andrew Roberts examines the man in his biography, Jenny Uglow explores living in Britain through Napoleon’s Wars, 1793-1815, Sudhir Hazareesingh looks at his legend, while musicologist Gavin Plumley focuses on Schubert in Vienna in the aftermath of Napoleon.

Should America Be Run by … Trader Joe’s?

Freakonomics Radio | 29 November 2018 | 0h 47m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Examines the role of choice architecture, efficiency, frugality, collaboration, and culture in Trader Joe’s success. Debunks standard marketing fluff: brands, advertising, social media, coupons and loyalty schemes.

Caste in Modern India

The Seen and the Unseen | 22 January 2018 | 1h 10m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Shruti Rajagopalan, who applies an economist’s perspective to understanding the persistence of caste in India. Frames caste as a problem of economic freedom, perpetuated by a cultural focus on villages, ameliorated by faster urbanisation.