Frank Dikötter on the History of China After Mao

Democracy Paradox | 11 October 2022 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Frank Dikötter about his book China After Mao: The Rise of a Superpower. Backgrounds the efforts of the Chinese Communist Party to maintain its grip on power and argues that China’s economic progress is almost entirely due to it joining the WTO, with China having undertaken little in the way of economic reform.

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Restoring Dynamism in a Decadent Society with Ross Douthat

Venture Stories | 29 September 2022 | 0h 51m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Ross Douthat about his book The Decadent Society: How We Became the Victims of Our Own Success. Sets out the evidence for stagnation, argues that we need a renaissance to get ourselves out of the age of decadence, and considers what of his arguments have endured in the three years since publication.

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What Does the Science Say? | Dr. Richard Lindzen

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast | 5 January 2023 | 1h 44m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Richard Lindzen discussing the facts of climate change, the models used to predict it, the dismal state of academia, and the politicized world of “professional” science.

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Birdwatching: How Four Prisoners of War Survived Captivity

Dan Snow’s History Hit | 3 January 2023 | 0h 20m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Derek Niemann about his book Birds in a Cage. Tells the story of four Second World War British POWs who overcame the trials and tribulations of internment through a shared passion for birdwatching. Discusses why this obsession helped them survive the POW camps, and how it drove them to become giants of post-war British wildlife conservation.

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Andrea McDowell, We the Miners: Self-Government in the California Gold Rush

History of California Podcast | 24 October 2022 | 0h 34m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Andrea McDowell about her book We the Miners: Self-Government in the California Gold Rush. Discusses self-government in the 19C California gold rush using the parliamentary procedure now known as Robert’s Rules of Order. The miners adopted law codes, decided property disputes, and held criminal trials, even after the State of California established the official court system.

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Lars Doucet – Georgism, Progress, Poverty, & Why Rent is Too Damn High

The Lunar Society | 10 January 2022 | 1h 40m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Lars Doucet about his book Land is a Big Deal. Digs deep into Georgism – the notion of taxing increases in land value. Discusses why even the wealthiest places in the world have poverty and homelessness; why rents increase as fast as wages; why land-owners are able to extract the profits that rightly belong to labour and capital; and how taxing the value of land would alleviate speculation, NIMBYism, and income and sales taxes.

This digs deep into the arguments for and against a land value tax. The earlier Narratives episode serves as a gentler introduction. I’m rather persuaded by the arguments presented. Is there something I’ve missed, or is this a no-brainer policy change?

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Frank Dikötter on Mao’s Great Famine

EconTalk | 6 August 2018 | 1h 12m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Frank Dikötter about his book Mao’s Great Famine: The History of China’s Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958–1962. Chronicles the strategies Mao and the Chinese leadership implemented to increase grain and steel production in the late 1950s leading to a collapse in agricultural output and the deaths of millions by starvation.

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How to Fix Human Capital

Risk Talking | 30 November 2022 | 0h 39m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Jonathan Meer discussing the American labour market, the need to prioritise skilled labour, and changes educators can make to prepare young people to enter the workplace.

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