Michael Muthukrishna: Human Culture, The Cultural Brain, And Political Corruption

The Dissenter | 9 May 2019 | 1 h 13m | Listen Later
Interview with Michael Muthukrishna about the psychological and evolutionary processes that underlie culture and how culture is transmitted, maintained and modified. Discusses the interplay between biology and culture in explaining large-scale human cooperation; the biological bases of human culture; the Cultural Brain Hypothesis; the relationship between individual-level psychology and group-level traits; genetic and cultural evolution; group selection; prosocial institutions; political corruption and how societies might promote it and also common strategies to fight it that might backfire.

Culture, Innovation, and the Collective Brain

Many Minds | 3 February 2021 | 1h 29m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Michael Muthukrishna about why our brains got so big; how culture makes us smart; where innovation comes from; the cultural brain hypothesis; what this means for a general theory of intelligence across species; explaining the Flynn Effect; how group size and interconnectedness power culture; the evolution of brain size in humans & cetaceans; why psychology needs to become a historical science; and more.

This episode was so insightful that I went looking for more. The episode with Michael Muthukrishna on The Dissenter is also very good.

The Power of Memes – Susan Blackmore

Dilemma Podcast | 21 October 2020 | 1h 09m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Susan Blackmore backgrounding mimetics – which analogises Darwinian evolution to explore how ideas propagate with replication, selection and variation. Draws on her book The Meme Machine.

Why Western Europeans Are So WEIRD and Why That Matters

The Insight | 8 September 2020 | 0h 50m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Joseph Henrich about his book The WEIRDest People in the World: How the West Became Psychologically Peculiar and Particularly Prosperous. Discusses the co-evolution of culture, institutions, and psychology and the implications for the large-scale social, political, and economic forces that drive human history.

Jonathan Schulz on Kinship Networks and Psychology

HistoryTwinsPodcast | 5 December 2019 | 0h 50m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jonathan Schulz about the Catholic Church, cousin marriage, and psychological variations between countries. Argues that the Church prohibition of cousin-marriage, which dissolved extended kin groups in early medieval times, was critical to the development of liberal democracy. Draws on his paper Kin-Networks and Institutional Development.