Giving Dutch History Its Due with Jonathan Scott

unSILOed with Greg LaBlanc | 19 April 2024 | 0h 51m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Jonathan Scott about his book How the Old World Ended: The Anglo-Dutch-American Revolution 1500–1800. Discusses the pivotal role the Netherlands played in the development of the modern world, how the Netherlands’ geography played a crucial role in its rise to dominance in the 17th century, why that power eventually shifted to favour England, and how the Anglo-Dutch influence has permeated throughout history.

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Can a Nation Plunder Its Way to Wealth (with Noah Smith)

EconTalk | 15 January 2024 | 1h 09m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Noah Smith about his essay Nations Don’t Get Rich by Plundering Other Nations. Discusses the impact of imperialism and industrialization on growth and wealth. Argues that understanding plunder and where wealth comes from is more than an exercise in economic history – it matters for today’s world, too.

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Maxine Berg and Pat Hudson on Slavery, Capitalism and the Industrial Revolution

New Books in Economic and Business History | 4 October 2023 | 1h 35m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Maxine Berg and Pat Hudson about their book Slavery, Capitalism, and the Industrial Revolution. Discusses the role of slavery in the making of Britain’s industrial revolution and argues that slavery is inextricably linked to Western capitalism and that many of us continue to benefit from slavery to this day.

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How Genes Maintain Social Status | Greg Clark

Aporia Podcast | 23 September 2023 | 1h 07m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Greg Clark about his study The Inheritance of Social Status: England, 1600 to 2022. Discusses the persistence of social status across multiple generations, the challenge this poses to the belief that social interventions and social institutions can influence rates of social mobility, and the evidence for a genetic role in social status.

See other interviews with Greg Clark.

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Making Social Spending Work

The Economic History Podcast | 25 May 2023 | 0h 33m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Peter Lindert about his book Making Social Spending Work. Reviews the evidence across time and countries to assess the effect of social spending on economic growth and identity metrics to govern appropriate social expenditure. Considers the reforms needed to tackle the looming pension crisis as populations age in many counties.

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The Bubble Triangle feat. William Quinn

unSILOed with Greg LaBlanc | 3 May 2023 | 0h 31m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with William Quinn about his book Boom and Bust: A Global History of Financial Bubbles, co-authored with John Turner. Discusses the “bubble triangle – the three conditions that must be in place for a boom, how media narratives shape bubbles, and historical bubbles that have gone overlooked.

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Tibor Rutar – Capitalism for Realists

Ideas Having Sex | 13 March 2023 | 1h 15m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Tibor Rutar about his book Capitalism for Realists: Virtues and Vices of the Modern Economy. Analyzes the costs and benefits of capitalism using a straightforward and empirical framework, evaluating key arguments for the causes of the Industrial Revolution along the way.

See also The Dissenter interview.

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Omer Moav on the Emergence of the State

EconTalk | 6 March 2023 | 1h 02m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Omer Moav about his paper The Origin of the State: Land Productivity or Appropriability?, co-authored with Joram Mayshar and Luigi Pascali. Argues that it wasn’t farming but the farming of storable crops (but not others) that led to hierarchy and the State. Also discusses why it’s important to understand the past and the challenges of confirming or refuting theories about history.

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