Tom Bergin: Why Are Economic Theories Made by Governments Wrong

Keen On | 7 January 2021 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Tom Bergin about his book Free Lunch Thinking: How Economics Ruins the Economy. Challenges economic orthodoxy, arguing that humans are less responsive to incentives than assumed by supply and demand modelling –  and that consequently economic ideas hurt living standards and drive inequality. Covers tobacco taxes, CEO pay, minimum wages, and whether regulation hurts growth.

Yuen Yuen Ang – China’s Gilded Age

New Books in Economics | 18 December 2020 | 0h 44m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Yuen Yuen Ang about her book China’s Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom and Vast Corruption. Defines four types of corruption: petty theft, grand theft, speed money, and access money, Explains that not all types of corruption carry the same harm and have the same impact on growth. Overviews research on corruption and argues that countries that appear free of corruption are just characterized by more sophisticated forms of corruption.

Benjamin Friedman on the Origins of Economic Belief

Conversations with Tyler | 27 January 2021 | 1h 07m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Benjamin Friedman about ideas from his book Religion and the Rise of Capitalism. Argues that contrary to the popular belief that Western economic ideas are a secular product of the Enlightenment, instead they are the result of hotly debated theological questions within the English-speaking Protestant world of thinkers like Adam Smith and David Hume. Discusses the connection between religious belief and support for markets, what drives varying cultural commitments to capitalism, why the rate of growth is key to sustaining liberal values, why Paul Volcker is underrated, why annuities don’t work better, America’s debt and fiscal sustainability, his critiques of nominal GDP targeting, why he wouldn’t change the governance of the Fed, how he maintains his motivation to keep learning, and more.

Sowell on Economic Facts and Fallacies

EconTalk | 28 February 2008 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Thomas Sowell about the ideas in his book Economic Facts and Fallacies. Discusses the misleading nature of measured income inequality, CEO pay, why nations grow or stay poor, the role of intellectuals and experts in designing public policy, and immigration.

Philip Coggan: How Did the World Get So Rich?

Political Economy with Jim Pethokoukis | 18 November 2020 | 0h 27m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Philip Coggan about his book More: A History of the World Economy from the Iron Age to the Information Age. Reflects on the history of the global economy and the lessons we can learn for today. Argues that it is the increased connection between people that resulted in increased trade, specialization, freedom, and ultimately, increased prosperity.

Economics and Parenting

RNZ: Nights | 21 January 2020 | 0h 22m | Listen Later
Interview with Eric Crampton applying an economist’s perspective to parenting. Covers choosing names; the implication from twin studies that parenting investments have limited payoffs in later-life outcomes; and using written bids to optimally allocate household chores. Draws on his article The Tender Years.

Zach Carter on the Life and Legacy of John Maynard Keynes

Conversations with Tyler | 2 December 2020 | 0h 54m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Zach Carter about his book The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes. Discusses the Treaty of Versailles, how working in the India Office influenced Keynes’ economic thinking, the seemingly strange paradox of his “liberal imperialism,” the elusive central message of The General Theory, the true extent of Keynes’ interest in eugenics, why he had a conservative streak, whether Bretton Woods was doomed to fail, the Enlightenment intuitions behind early defences of the gold standard, and more.

Walter Williams on Life, Liberty and Economics

EconTalk | 16 October 2006 | 1h 03m | Listen Later | iTunes
Walter E. Williams has died at 84 (NY Times obituary). This 2006 interview discusses his early days as an economist, his controversial view of the Civil War, the insights of Adam Smith and Friedrich Hayek, and some deep but simple economic principles.