David Ricardo

In Our Time | 25 March 2021 | 0h 49m | Listen Later | iTunes
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life and work of David Ricardo (1772 -1823). At a time when nations preferred to be self-sufficient, to produce all their own food and manufacture their own goods, and to find markets for export rather than import, Ricardo argued for free trade even with rivals for the benefit of all. He contended that existing economic policy unduly favoured landlords above all others and needed to change, and that nations would be less likely to go to war with their trading partners if they were more reliant on each other.

Emily Oster: “I Am a Woman Who Is Prominently Discussing Vaginas.”

People I (Mostly) Admire | 27 February 2021 | 0h 42m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Emily Oster. Discusses her data-driven approach to decisionmaking on pregnancy, parenting, and covid-19, Also discusses her research on genetic testing, how economists think versus non-economists, and the role of hepatitis B in the shortage of females in Asia.

John Cochrane on the Pandemic

EconTalk | 22 February 2021 | 1h 08m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with John Cochrane about the pandemic and the policy response. Argues that outcomes would have been much better if governments, in the United States and elsewhere, had embraced approaches that relied more on market forces. Serves as a demonstration of the powerful, but counter-intuitive insights available from free-market economic thinking.

Tom Bergin: Why Are Economic Theories Made by Governments Wrong

Keen On | 7 January 2021 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Tom Bergin about his book Free Lunch Thinking: How Economics Ruins the Economy. Challenges economic orthodoxy, arguing that humans are less responsive to incentives than assumed by supply and demand modelling –  and that consequently economic ideas hurt living standards and drive inequality. Covers tobacco taxes, CEO pay, minimum wages, and whether regulation hurts growth.

Yuen Yuen Ang – China’s Gilded Age

New Books in Economics | 18 December 2020 | 0h 44m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Yuen Yuen Ang about her book China’s Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom and Vast Corruption. Defines four types of corruption: petty theft, grand theft, speed money, and access money, Explains that not all types of corruption carry the same harm and have the same impact on growth. Overviews research on corruption and argues that countries that appear free of corruption are just characterized by more sophisticated forms of corruption.

Benjamin Friedman on the Origins of Economic Belief

Conversations with Tyler | 27 January 2021 | 1h 07m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Benjamin Friedman about ideas from his book Religion and the Rise of Capitalism. Argues that contrary to the popular belief that Western economic ideas are a secular product of the Enlightenment, instead they are the result of hotly debated theological questions within the English-speaking Protestant world of thinkers like Adam Smith and David Hume. Discusses the connection between religious belief and support for markets, what drives varying cultural commitments to capitalism, why the rate of growth is key to sustaining liberal values, why Paul Volcker is underrated, why annuities don’t work better, America’s debt and fiscal sustainability, his critiques of nominal GDP targeting, why he wouldn’t change the governance of the Fed, how he maintains his motivation to keep learning, and more.

Sowell on Economic Facts and Fallacies

EconTalk | 28 February 2008 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Thomas Sowell about the ideas in his book Economic Facts and Fallacies. Discusses the misleading nature of measured income inequality, CEO pay, why nations grow or stay poor, the role of intellectuals and experts in designing public policy, and immigration.

Philip Coggan: How Did the World Get So Rich?

Political Economy with Jim Pethokoukis | 18 November 2020 | 0h 27m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Philip Coggan about his book More: A History of the World Economy from the Iron Age to the Information Age. Reflects on the history of the global economy and the lessons we can learn for today. Argues that it is the increased connection between people that resulted in increased trade, specialization, freedom, and ultimately, increased prosperity.