Catherine Semcer on Poaching, Preserves, and African Wildlife

EconTalk | 18 February 2019 | 1h 07m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Catherine Semcer drawing on her background in African wildlife conservation. Discusses the role of incentives in preserving wildlife in Africa and, counter-intuitively, how allowing limited hunting of big game has improved both habitat and wildlife populations while reducing poaching.

Dick Carpenter on Bottleneckers

EconTalk | 8 January 2018 | 1h 14m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Dick Carpenter of the Institute for Justice and author of Bottleneckers: Gaming the Government for Power and Private Profit. Explains the perniciousness of occupational licensing and other regulation that protects existing job holders from competition.

Jennifer Doleac on Crime

EconTalk | 21 January 2019 | 1h 22m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Jennifer Doleac about research on crime, police, and the unexpected consequences of the criminal justice system. Topics discussed include legislation banning asking job applicants if they’ve been in prison, body cameras for police, the use of DNA databases, the use of Naloxone to prevent death from opioid overdose, and the challenges of being an economist who thinks about crime using the economist’s toolkit.

Stephen Kotkin on Solzhenitsyn

EconTalk | 14 January 2019 | 1h 00m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with historian and author Stephen Kotkin about the historical significance of the life and work of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Also has insights on Russia, Stalin and the role of culture in politics.

Sebastian Junger on Tribe

EconTalk | 31 December 2018 | 1h 16m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Sebastian Junger about his book Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging. Explores the human need to be needed and the challenges facing many individuals in modern society who struggle to connect with others. His studies of communal connection include soldiers in a small combat unit and American Indian society in the nineteenth century.

Mariana Mazzucato on the Value of Everything

EconTalk | 24 December 2018 | 1h 07m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Mariana Mazzucato about her book The Value of Everything, which argues that economists have mismeasured value and have failed to appreciate the role of government as innovator. She argues for a more active role for government in the innovation process and for government to share in revenue proportional to its role in the creation of new technology.

Bryan Caplan on the Case Against Education

EconTalk | 12 February 2018 | 1h 11m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Bryan Caplan on The Case Against Education. Argues that very little learning takes place at university and that very little of the return comes from skills or knowledge acquired in the classroom. Caplan marshals the evidence to support his claims, finding that just 11% of the economic gains from education are due to the training received; 45% from the greater ability of the students who go to university; and 44% is pure signalling – from being credentialed.

Bruce Bueno de Mesquita on the Spoils of War

EconTalk | 12 December 2016 | 1h 15m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with political scientist Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, co-author of The Spoils of War. Backgrounds the correlation between US presidential reputations and the number of people dying while that president is in office. Argues that the decision to go to war is made in self-interested ways and makes the case for a revisionist perspective on the presidencies of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and others.