The Fracking Boom, a Baby Boom, and Marriage

Freakonomics Radio | 6 July 2017 | 0h 43m | Listen Later
Over 40 percent of U.S. births are to unmarried mothers, and the numbers are especially high among the less-educated. Why? One argument is that the decline in good manufacturing jobs led to a decline in “marriageable” men. Cleverly uses high paying jobs for less educated men in the fracking boom as a natural experiment to explore marriage dynamics.

How Do We Know What Really Works in Healthcare?

Freakonomics Radio | 2 April 2015 | 0h 41m | Listen Later
A lot of conventional wisdom in medicine is nothing more than a hunch or wishful thinking. A new breed of data detectives is hoping to change that.

The Future of Meat

Freakonomics Radio | 14 February 2019 | 0h 51m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs. Will reconciling these two forces be possible — or, even better, Impossible™?

This Economist Predicted the Last Crisis. What’s the Next One?

Freakonomics Radio | 7 February 2019 | 0h 49m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Raghuram Rajan, formerly chief economist at the IMF and Governor of the Reserve Bank of India, on financial system risks and potential solutions.

The Most Ambitious Thing Humans Have Ever Attempted

Freakonomics Radio | 26 April 2018 | 0h 51m | Listen Later 
Conversation with Atul Gawande, cancer surgeon, public-health researcher, and best-selling author. The U.S. spends more on healthcare than any other country, with so-so outcomes. Discusses Gawande’s simple ideas for treating a painfully complex system.

People Aren’t Dumb. The World Is Hard

Freakonomics Radio | 20 December 2018 | 0h 57m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Good humoured interview with Richard Thaler about winning a Nobel Prize for showing that humans tend to make irrational decisions. Backgrounds behavioural economics. Describes his unlikely route to success; his reputation for being lazy; and his efforts to fix the world — one nudge at a time.

Is the Protestant Work Ethic Real?

Freakonomics Radio | 6 July 2018 | 0h 40m | Listen Later  | iTunes
In the early 20th century, Max Weber argued that Protestantism created wealth. Finally, there are data to appraise whether he was right. All it took were some missionary experiments in the Philippines and a clever map-matching trick that goes back to 16th-century Germany.