The Economist’s Guide to Parenting: 10 Years Later

Freakonomics Radio | 21 October 2021 | 0h 51m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Ten years ago Freakonomics asked a bunch of economists with young kids how they approached child-rearing (episode 39). This episode checks in with the children about their parents. It’s hilarious, covering nature versus nurture, capitalism versus Marxism, and why you sometimes don’t tell your friends that your father is an economist.

All You Need Is Nudge

Freakonomics Radio | 9 September 2021 | 0h 58m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Richard Thaler about his book Nudge: The Final Edition co-authored with Cass Sunstein). Discusses behavioural economics; how nudge theory held up in the face of a global financial meltdown, a pandemic, and other existential crises; and argues that nudging is more relevant today than ever.

How to Get Anyone to Do Anything

Freakonomics Radio | 27 May 2021 | 0h 58m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Robert Cialdini about the expanded and revised edition of his book Influence. Backgrounds the science of persuasion and gives a master class in the seven psychological levers that bewitch our rational minds and lead us to buy, behave, or believe without a second thought.

How to Stop Worrying and Love the Robot Apocalypse

Freakonomics Radio | 6 May 2021 | 0h 48m | Listen Later | iTunes
Evaluates the impact that robots (and other smart technologies) will have on jobs, particularly the scope for newer collaborative robots (“cobots”) to totally reinvigorate how work gets done.

Jeff Immelt Knows He Let You Down

Freakonomics Radio | 18 February 2021 | 0h 45m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jeff Immelt about his book Hot Seat: What I Learned Leading a Great American Company. Discusses his time as CEO of GE, formerly the most valuable company in the world, now selling off body parts to survive.

How Much Do We Really Care About Children?

Freakonomics Radio | 14 January 2021 | 0h 47m | Listen Later | iTunes
Explores child car seats as an example of a counter-productive policy intended to benefit children. Covers the downturn in fertility implied by COVID-19 economic downturn and the demographic challenges that implies; the reduction in fertility attributable to child car seat regulation; and the questionable benefits of child car seats.

What if Your Company Had No Rules?

Freakonomics Radio | 12 September 2020 | 0h 55m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Reed Hastings about his book No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention, co-authored with Erin Meyer. Backgrounds how he came to believe that corporate rules kill creativity and innovation. Advocates that for some companies the greatest risk can be taking no risks at all and that it is better to prioritise flexibility than efficiency.

See also How to Fire People, an interview with Patty McCord about the Netflix culture.