What if Your Company Had No Rules?

Freakonomics Radio | 12 September 2020 | 0h 55m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Reed Hastings about his book No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention, co-authored with Erin Meyer. Backgrounds how he came to believe that corporate rules kill creativity and innovation. Advocates that for some companies the greatest risk can be taking no risks at all and that it is better to prioritise flexibility than efficiency.

See also How to Fire People, an interview with Patty McCord about the Netflix culture.

The Simple Economics of Saving the Amazon Rain Forest

Freakonomics Radio | 30 July 2020 | 0h 32m | Listen Later | iTunes
Steven Levitt explains the economic case for the rest of the world paying Brazil to preserve Amazonian rainforest.

How to Make Your Own Luck

Freakonomics Radio | 2 July 2020 | 1h 00m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Maria Konnikova about her book The Biggest Bluff. Discusses insights on decisionmaking gleaned from learning to be a professional poker player. Includes excerpts read by Konnikova.

This is the prototype for a potential new podcast from Steven Dubner, which sets a new high standard for an author interview about their book. Email radio@freakonomics.com to offer encouragement.

The Truth About the Vaping Crisis

Freakonomics Radio | 21 November 2019 | 0h 44m | Listen Later | iTunes
Contrasts the successful regulation of vaping in the UK, motivated by harm reduction, with the deaths and high teen uptake as the US attempts to ban vaping.

How to Change Your Mind

Freakonomics Radio | 30 May 2019 | 0h 45m | Listen Later | iTunes
Explores the barriers to changing your mind (ego, overconfidence, inertia and cost) and how to get better at changing your mind with neuroscientist (and primatologist) Robert Sapolsky.

23andMe (and You, and Everyone Else)

Freakonomics Radio | 16 May 2019 | 0h 49m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Anne Wojcicki, founder and CEO of 23andMe discussing the revolution in home DNA testing, which gives consumers important, possibly life-changing information. It’s also building a gigantic database that could lead to medical breakthroughs. But how will you deal with upsetting news? What if your privacy is compromised? And are you prepared to have your DNA monetized?