This Economist Predicted the Last Crisis. What’s the Next One?

Freakonomics Radio | 7 February 2019 | 0h 49m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Raghuram Rajan, formerly chief economist at the IMF and Governor of the Reserve Bank of India, on financial system risks and potential solutions.

The Most Ambitious Thing Humans Have Ever Attempted

Freakonomics Radio | 26 April 2018 | 0h 51m | Listen Later 
Conversation with Atul Gawande, cancer surgeon, public-health researcher, and best-selling author. The U.S. spends more on healthcare than any other country, with so-so outcomes. Discusses Gawande’s simple ideas for treating a painfully complex system.

People Aren’t Dumb. The World Is Hard

Freakonomics Radio | 20 December 2018 | 0h 57m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Good humoured interview with Richard Thaler about winning a Nobel Prize for showing that humans tend to make irrational decisions. Backgrounds behavioural economics. Describes his unlikely route to success; his reputation for being lazy; and his efforts to fix the world — one nudge at a time.

Is the Protestant Work Ethic Real?

Freakonomics Radio | 6 July 2018 | 0h 40m | Listen Later  | iTunes
In the early 20th century, Max Weber argued that Protestantism created wealth. Finally, there are data to appraise whether he was right. All it took were some missionary experiments in the Philippines and a clever map-matching trick that goes back to 16th-century Germany.

Should America Be Run by … Trader Joe’s?

Freakonomics Radio | 29 November 2018 | 0h 47m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Examines the role of choice architecture, efficiency, frugality, collaboration, and culture in Trader Joe’s success. Debunks standard marketing fluff: brands, advertising, social media, coupons and loyalty schemes.

Two (Totally Opposite) Ways to Save the Planet

Freakonomics Radio | 22 August 2018 | 0h 51m | Listen Later  | iTunes
While environmentalists say we’re doomed if we don’t drastically reduce consumption, technologists say that human ingenuity can solve just about any problem. Discusses the ideas in Charles C. Mann’s The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow’s World. Nicely frames why each side can’t get the other.

What Can Uber Teach Us About the Gender Pay Gap?

Freakonomics Radio | 6 February 2018 | 0h 42m | Listen Later 
A new perspective on the gender pay gap, using data from over a million Uber drivers. Offers three behavioural differences as explanations for the gender pay gap, notwithstanding Uber’s gender agnostic algorithms.