Kathryn Paige Harden || Genetic Inequality, IQ, and Education

The Psychology Podcast | 30 September 2021 | 1h 22m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Kathryn Paige Harden about her book The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality. Explains what genetic information can and can’t illuminate and argues for the importance of taking account of genetics to improve social policy.

See also Kathryn Paige Harden on Genetics, Luck, and Fairness.

Kathryn Paige Harden on Genetics, Luck, and Fairness

Sean Carroll’s Mindscape | 20 September 2021 | 1h 25m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Kathryn Paige Harden about her book The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality. Argues that DNA matters to how we understand people, that we can clearly measure some of its effects, and understanding those effects is a crucial tool in fighting discrimination and making the world a more equitable place.

See also the excellent New Yorker profile of Hardin.

A Short History of Humanity with Johannes Krause

The Innovation Show | 22 May 2021 | 1h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Johannes Krause about his book A Short History of Humanity. Discusses insights on human evolution from his work with ancient DNA: the successive waves of migration and the inter-relationships between human groups; light skin as an adaptation to a vegetarian farming diet; patriarchy and inequality emerging with the transition to farming; warfare emerging with the metal age; and lactase persistence allowing farmers to have more children.

Jason Munshi-South: Rats and Evolution

Razib Khan’s Unsupervised Learning | 13 August 2021 | 1h 03m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Jason Munshi-South about the ecology and genetics of rats. Discusses the brown rat versus other species; their interactions with mice and cats; the origins, phylogeography and genetics of brown rats; and their use as a model organism.

Matt Ridley: Evolutionist, Thatcherite, and Writer

Razib Khan’s Unsupervised Learning | 18 March 2021 | 1h 10m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Matt Ridley about his 1999 book Genome and how its insights on genomics have held up since. Touches on his other books and discusses the relevance of evolution to everything, why Francis Crick is going to get “cancelled” at some point, if he’s still a happy Thatcherite, Britain’s response to Covid-19; and the origin of Covid-19 (his next book project).

Greg Clark: For Whom The Bell Curve Tolls

Razib Khan’s Unsupervised Learning | 8 May 2021 | 0h 56m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Gregory Clark discussing the controversy around, and the ideas from, his upcoming book For Whom The Bell Curve Tolls. Explores his finding of very high long-term persistence of social status across lineages, and possible explanations for this, including genetic factors.

Gregory Clark on Social Status and Genetics

Coffee With Cornelius | 19 June 2020 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Gregory Clark discussing his research on social mobility, the effect of elite fecundity on the Industrial Revolution, and economic history more generally. Draws on his books The Son Also Rises, A Farewell to Alms and the forthcoming For Whom the Bell Curve Tolls.

Ancient DNA And The Five Ancestral Lineages of Modern Dogs

The Insight | 26 November 2020 | 1h 06m | Listen Later
Interview with Anders Bergstrom discussing his paper Origins and Genetic Legacy of Prehistoric Dogs. Discusses his work uncovering the ancestral lineages of modern dogs, relationships with wolves, the greater genetic diversity in the past, how unusual phenotypes persisted even as European dog genetics spread throughout the world, and the similarities and differences with human population genetics.