Gregory Radick – Disputed Inheritance: The Battle over Mendel and the Future of Biology

The Dissenter | 5 February 2024 | 1h 12m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Gregory Radick about his book Disputed Inheritance: The Battle over Mendel and the Future of Biology. Discusses the inter-relationships between the work of Mendel, Darwin and Francis Galton; the early 20C debate between William Bateson and W. F. R. Weldon about whether Mendelian genetics should be the standard entry point for learning about genes. Argues that if Weldon had lived longer and his view of Mendelian genetics as a special case ignoring environmental effects won out, we would have framed genetics fundamentally differently, with less of a framing of heredity as destiny.

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Noor Siddiqui on Embryo Screening, the Fertility Crisis, and Parenting

“Upstream” with Erik Torenberg | 15 December 2023 | 1h 07m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Noor Siddiqui, founder and CEO of Orchid, discussing Orchid’s recent breakthrough in embryo whole genome sequencing, the fertility crisis, parenting, dating, and more.

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David Anthony: the Origin of Indo-Europeans

Razib Khan’s Unsupervised Learning | 21 May 2021 | 1h 04m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with David Anthony about his 2007 book The Horse, The Wheel, and Language. Discusses the archaeological and genetic evidence for a massive migration from the steppe as the origins of Indo-European languages, the enormous genetic impact of the Yamnaya people, changing thinking about migration, and the domestication of the horse.

Razib Khan has done a follow-up interview that updates progress over the last two years on the domestication of the horse, the spread of the wheel, and Yamnaya steppe herders’ language. See also the Tides of History interview with David Anthony.

I highly recommend reading The Horse, The Wheel, and Language and also Razib Khan’s Substack, which has lots of pieces on steppe migration.

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How Genes Maintain Social Status | Greg Clark

Aporia Podcast | 23 September 2023 | 1h 07m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Greg Clark about his study The Inheritance of Social Status: England, 1600 to 2022. Discusses the persistence of social status across multiple generations, the challenge this poses to the belief that social interventions and social institutions can influence rates of social mobility, and the evidence for a genetic role in social status.

See other interviews with Greg Clark.

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Elizabeth Jones on Ancient DNA: The Making of a Celebrity Science

Razib Khan’s Unsupervised Learning | 23 June 2023 | 0h 55m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Elizabeth Jones about her book Ancient DNA: The Making of a Celebrity Science. Discusses the excitement in paleogenetics in the 1990s on the back of strong public interest caused by Michael Crichton’s 1990 novel Jurassic Park, its subsequent retrenchment as a field, and the prompt renaissance in the late 2000’s under the leadership of Svante Pääbo and Eske Willerslev.

See also other episodes on Ancient DNA.

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Matthew Cobb – As Gods: A Moral History of the Genetic Age

The Michael Shermer Show | 27 December 2022 | 2h 00m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Matthew Cobb about his book As Gods: A Moral History of the Genetic Age. Discusses objections to genetic engineering (political, religious, cultural), selective breeding, recombinant DNA, the ethics of genetics, patenting life, gene therapy, gene editing, CRISPR, literature and films on the dangers of genetic engineering, bioweapons, 3 Laws of Behavior Genetics, and what people fear about it.

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How Did Humans Evolve?

Babbage from The Economist | 12 July 2022 | 0h 40m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Dylan Barry travels to South Africa to trace the story of human evolution, explaining how interbreeding with other species provided the genes possessed by many people today. To uncover our origins, scientists are nowadays not only hunting for clues in the bones of our ancestors—but in the genomes of living people, too. Speaks to researchers who are helping to rewrite the human story.

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Sir Walter F. Bodmer: From R.A. Fisher to Genomics

Razib Khan’s Unsupervised Learning | 19 May 2022 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Sir Walter Bodmer about his recollections of R.A Fisher, his PhD advisor, who made foundational contributions to population genetics and statistics, but has been the subject of a cancellation controversy. Also discusses Bodmer’s work, the human genome project, The People of the British Isles Project, and more.

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