What Venture Capitalists Can Teach Companies About Decision-Making

HBR Ideacast | 28 May 2024 | 0h 27m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Ilya Strebulaev about his book The Venture Mindset: How to Make Smarter Bets and Achieve Extraordinary Growth, co-authored with Alex Dang, and their HBR article Make Decisions with a VC Mindset. Explains exactly how venture capitalists operationalize risk, embrace disagreement over consensus, and stay agile in their decision-making – all valuable lessons that apply outside of Silicon Valley.

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To Negotiate Better, Start with Yourself

HBR Ideacast | 5 March 2024 | 0h 26m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with William Ury about his book Possible: How We Survive (and Thrive) in an Age of Conflict. Shares methods for negotiating better outcomes, emphasising that the biggest obstacle in a negotiation is often yourself – not your opponent.

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Rethinking Growth at All Costs

HBR Ideacast | 27 February 2024 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Gary Pisano about his HBR article How Fast Should Your Company Really Grow? Backgrounds that most firms fail to consistently increase revenues and profits over the long term, adjusting for inflation. Argues that it’s important for leaders to think more strategically about not just the rate of growth they want to achieve but the direction they want to grow in and their method for doing so. Trying to grow too fast can be the downfall of many organizations. Shares examples of companies that have fallen into this trap, as well as those getting the balance right.

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Nouriel Roubini on Megathreats

HBR IdeaCast | 25 October 2022 | 0h 29m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Nouriel Roubini about his book Megathreats: Ten Dangerous Trends that Imperil our Future, and How to Survive Them. Argues that a confluence of trends – from skyrocketing public and private debt and bad monetary policies to demographic shifts and the rise of AI – are pushing the world toward catastrophe. Suggests how political and business leaders can prepare for and navigate through these challenges.

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Red Flags You Won’t See on a CEO’s Resume

HBR IdeaCast | 12 July 2022 | 0h 22m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Aiyesha Dey about her HBR article When Hiring CEOs, Focus on Character. Describes her research that found that an individual’s materialism (based on the cost of cars and houses) and propensity for rule breaking (criminal records and speeding) predicts the risk of fraud, insider trading, and risky business activities.

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How Tech Adoption Fuels China’s Innovation Boom

HBR IdeaCast | 4 May 2021 | 0h 25m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Zak Dychtwald about his HBR article China’s New Innovation Advantage. Explains that the perception of China as a copycat and not an innovator is outdated. Argues that the willingness of Chinese consumers to try new things is powering the country’s new innovation economy. Technology adoption rates in areas such as mobile payment are extremely high (90% in China versus 24% in US). Describes how non-Chinese companies can learn important lessons from this rapidly changing market and potentially use it to jump-start their own innovation.

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Bill Gates on How Business Leaders Can Fight Climate Change

HBR IdeaCast | 16 February 2021 | 0h 25m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Bill Gates about his book How to Avoid a Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need. Makes the case for aggressive action to get to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 and insists that regulation isn’t enough. Argues that businesses need to pave the way forward by investing much more heavily in climate-friendly innovation.

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The Fundamental Human Relationship with Work

HBR IdeaCast | 13 October 2020 | 0h 25m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with James Suzman about his book Work: A History of How We Spend Our Time. Applies an anthropologist’s perspective from studying an ancient hunter-gatherer society to suggest that our modern notions of work, economy, and productivity are perhaps too limiting. Argues that humans have always been drawn to work for its intrinsic value and that managers can prepare for the future workplace by broadening their thinking about work and purpose.

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