The Sorting Hat

Hidden Brain | 15 April 2019 | 0h 50m | Listen Later | iTunes
The desire to know who we are and where we belong has led to a thriving industry built on the marketing and sale of personality tests. These tests offer individuals – and, increasingly, employers – quick and easy insights that can be used to make some of life’s biggest decisions. But most fail to stand up to scientific scrutiny. An exploration of the world of personality testing, and the many ways we assess personality and potential – from the Chinese zodiac to Harry Potter houses to the Myers-Briggs test.

Radically Normal

Hidden Brain | 8 April 2019 | 0h 52m | Listen Later | iTunes
For generations, living openly as a gay person in the United States was difficult, and often dangerous. But there’s been a dramatic change in public attitudes toward gay people. Explores one of the most striking transformations of public attitude ever recorded. Also considers whether the strategies used by gay rights activists hold lessons for other groups seeking change.

What Twins Tell Us

Hidden Brain | 25 March 2019 | 0h 30m | Listen Later | iTunes
Nancy Segal on the story of the Bogota twins – two sets of identical twins mixed up at birth and raised as fraternal twins. A tragedy, a soap opera, and a science experiment, all rolled into one. Uses the stories of twins raised apart to explore the role that genes and the environment play in shaping our identities. Based on the book Accidental Brothers: The Story of Twins Exchanged at Birth and the Power of Nature and Nurture.

Unreal Sex

Hidden Brain | 11 March 2019 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Kate Devlin, author of Turned On: Science, Sex and Robots. Explores the history of artificial love and considers what love and sex look like in an age of robots and artificial intelligence.

When Did Marriage Become So Hard?

Hidden Brain | 13 February 2018 | 0h 51m | Listen Later | iTunes
Marriage is hard – and there are signs it’s becoming even harder. Examines how long-term relationships have changed over time, and whether we might be able to improve marriage by asking less of it.

The Lazarus Drug

Hidden Brain | 29 October 2018 | 0h 49m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Naloxone can reverse an opioid overdose within seconds and has been hailed by first responders and public health researchers. But earlier this year, two economists released a study that suggested naloxone might be leading some users to engage in riskier behaviour — and causing more deaths than it saves. Explores with researchers, drug users and families the mental calculus of opioid use, and why there’s still so much to understand about addiction.

Man Up

Hidden Brain | 1 October 2018 | 0h 42m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Male workforce participation is falling, in part due to men’s reluctance to move into sectors traditionally viewed as women’s work. Explores definitions of masculinity; research that suggests that manhood is “hard to earn and easy to lose”; and the compensations deployed by men undertaking traditionally female work.

Why Now?

Hidden Brain | 6 February 2018 | 0h 52m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Uses social science to explain the changes in our minds and culture that allowed the #MeToo movement to gain traction now after previous allegations of sexual misconduct went nowhere.