Women in the Workforce (Over the Very Long Run)

The Economic History Podcast | 5 October 2020 | 0h 55m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jane Humphries about her research on women in the workforce. Discusses the implications of her findings on the nature of women’s work, wages through time, hand spinners’ income, and historical living standards to the role of the European Marriage Pattern, the Black Death, the male breadwinner model, and Engel’s pause to the Industrial Revolution and faster economic growth. Draws on her papers The Wages of Women in England, 1260–1850; Spinning the Industrial Revolution; and Unreal Wages? Real Income and Economic Growth in England, 1260–1850.

The Spirit of Innovation

New Money Review Podcast | 24 February 2020 | 0h 31m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Anton Howes on innovation and the factors driving the timing and location of the Industrial Revolution. Discusses why Elizabethan England lagged in agriculture and industry; how an ‘improving mentality’ came to England; institutional support for innovation; the role of royal monopolies and early corporations, great exhibitions, world fairs and international competition; and copyrights, patents and innovation.

Anton’s newsletter, Age of Invention, was probably my favourite discovery of the last year or so. His book, Arts and Minds: How the Royal Society of Arts Changed a Nation will be published 12 May 2020.

James Watt: The Power of Steam

The Forum | 27 June 2019 | 0h 43m | Listen Later | iTunes
Discusses the life and work of James Watt, the Scottish innovator whose improved steam engine helped power the Industrial Revolution and lay the basis for much of the mechanised world we take for granted now.