Thomas Piketty on A Brief History of Equality

New Books in Economics | 16 May 2022 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Thomas Piketty about his book A Brief History of Equality. Discusses his life and work, the choice to write a more concise book, the long term trend toward greater equality, potential equality improvement in future, Haiti and reparations, and reparations for specific injustices.

Ellen Peters on Innumeracy in the Wild: Misunderstanding and Misusing Numbers

New Books in Mathematics | 31 May 2021 | 1h 08m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Ellen Peters about her book Innumeracy in the Wild: Misunderstanding and Misusing Numbers. Describes the three components of numeric ability – objective numeracy, subjective numeracy, and the innate number sense – and how they vary within and across populations. Discusses the inequities caused by this variance in quantitative reasoning skills.

James Heckman on Inequality and Economic Mobility

EconTalk | 26 July 2021 | 1h 23m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with James Heckman about inequality and economic mobility. Drawing on research on inequality in Denmark with Rasmus Landerso, Heckman argues that despite the efforts of the Danish welfare state to provide equal access to education, there is little difference in economic mobility between the United States and Denmark. Includes a general discussion of economic mobility in the United States along with a critique of Chetty and others’ work on the power of neighbourhood to determine one’s economic destiny.

Heckman criticises the progressive belief that increased social spending will open up opportunity for the less advantaged. But he too appears to have a blind spot – attributing the persistence of advantage to family factors. Gregory Clark’s work points to that being due largely to genetics, rather than behaviours of the family. And if genetics is truly the source of persistent advantage, doesn’t that suggest that it’s only fair to use high taxes and transfers to even things out?

Honey, Income Inequality Led Me to Overwork the Kids

Innovation Hub | 29 Nvember 2019| 0h 20m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Matthias Doepke about his book Love, Money and Parenting: How Economics Explains the Way We Raise Our Kids, co-authored with Fabrizio Zilibotti. We tend to assume that parenting is all about culture and that parents from different countries or backgrounds parent differently because of those different backgrounds with varied religious, political, and geographical traditions. Argues that economics is the real driver of parenting approaches and sets out the evidence that differences in income inequality largely shape how we raise our children.

Greg Clark: For Whom The Bell Curve Tolls

Razib Khan’s Unsupervised Learning | 8 May 2021 | 0h 56m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Gregory Clark discussing the controversy around, and the ideas from, his upcoming book For Whom The Bell Curve Tolls. Explores his finding of very high long-term persistence of social status across lineages, and possible explanations for this, including genetic factors.

Gregory Clark on Social Status and Genetics

Coffee With Cornelius | 19 June 2020 | 1h 06m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Gregory Clark discussing his research on social mobility, the effect of elite fecundity on the Industrial Revolution, and economic history more generally. Draws on his books The Son Also Rises, A Farewell to Alms and the forthcoming For Whom the Bell Curve Tolls.

Dying from Despair in the USA: A Discussion with Anne Case

Princeton UP Ideas Podcast | 15 March 2021 | 0h 57m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Anne Case about ideas from her book Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism, co-authored with Angus Deaton. Backgrounds the increasing deaths from pain and despair for American adults without a degree. Ties this to the weakening position of labour, the growing power of corporations, and the lack of affordable health care.

Dr Walter Scheidel – The Great Leveler

The Michael Shermer Show | 11 June 2017 | 0h 57m | Listen Later
Interview with Walter Scheidel about his book The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the 21st Century. Traces the global history of inequality, showing that inequality declines when carnage and disaster strike and increases when peace and stability return.