Amy Stanley on Stranger in the Shogun’s City

New Books Network | 12 November 2020 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Amy Stanley about her biography Stranger in the Shogun’s City: A Japanese Woman and Her World. Discusses the life of Tsuneno, from growing up in a rural community through her escape to the city of Edo, where she lives in the final decades of the Tokugawa Shogunate. Also covers the historical setting and how Tsuneno’s life tells us more about life, especially the life of women, during this period of Japanese history.

Japan’s Sakoku Period

In Our Time | 4 April 2013 | 0h 42m | Listen Later | iTunes
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Japan’s Sakoku period, two centuries when the country deliberately isolated itself from the Western world. Sakoku began with a series of edicts in the 1630s which restricted the rights of Japanese to leave their country and expelled most of the Europeans living there. For the next two hundred years, Dutch traders were the only Westerners free to live in Japan. It was not until 1858 and the gunboat diplomacy of the American Commodore Matthew Perry that Japan’s international isolation finally ended. Although historians used to think of Japan as completely isolated from external influence during this period, recent scholarship suggests that Japanese society was far less isolated from European ideas during this period than previously thought.

The Making of Modern Japan

The Forum | 8 September 2018 | 0h 39m | Listen Later  | iTunes
From the mid-19th century, Japan transformed itself from feudal state to economic powerhouse at breakneck speed. The rebel samurai who seized power in 1868 removed an entire ruling elite, introduced national conscription and compulsory education, building a brand new society. Unpacks the origins of this transformation, and examines how it led to imperial expansion and the subsequent atrocities of World War II.