The West’s Enduring Fascination with Asia

History Extra | 29 January 2024 | 0h 50m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Christopher Harding about his book The Light of Asia: A History of Western Fascination with the East. Discusses Westerners’ enduring fascination with India, China and Japan, and the ways it has shaped the relationship between East and West from the ancient world to the 21st century.

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Japan’s Tokugawa Shogunate

Dan Snow’s History Hit | 10 January 2024 | 0h 29m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Christopher Harding about Japan’s Tokugawa Shogunate. Discusses how the prior Warring States period brought Japan to its knees, with rival warlords fighting bitterly for control of the land; how Tokugawa Ieyasu emerged victorious in the early 17C, the first of three ‘Great Unifers’; and how this military government worked to restore order and stability to Japan, and why it eventually came to an end.

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Victoria Lee: The Arts of the Microbial World

New Books in Japanese Studies | 16 July 2023 | 0h 50m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Victoria Lee about her book The Arts of the Microbial World: Fermentation Science in Twentieth-Century Japan. Explores the history of microbial science in modern Japan, discussing how Japanese scientists and artisans in food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries harnessed a combination of premodern and modern understandings of the microbial world to create a productive approach positing microbes “as living workers” in important industries.

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How Abe Reshaped Japan

ChinaTalk | 26 July 2021 | 1h 16m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Tobias Harris about his book The Iconoclast: Shinzo Abe and the New Japan. Discusses the dramatic rise, fall, and rise again to power of Abe Shinzo; how he reshaped governance in Japan through bureaucratic reform; and how he managed relations with the US and China.

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To The Quad! The Origins of “Indo-Pacific”

ChinaTalk | 13 March 2021 | 0h 51m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Rory Medcalf about his book Indo-Pacific Empire: China, America and the Contest for the World’s Pivotal Region. Discusses 15th-century Korean maps, the promise of the 1947 Asian Relations Conference, Australia and India’s shifting conceptions of their place in the region, the origins of the Quad (US, Japan, Australia-India Quadrilateral Security Dialogue), and China-Australia relations.

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Amy Stanley on Stranger in the Shogun’s City

New Books Network | 12 November 2020 | 0h 41m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Amy Stanley about her biography Stranger in the Shogun’s City: A Japanese Woman and Her World. Discusses the life of Tsuneno, from growing up in a rural community through her escape to the city of Edo, where she lives in the final decades of the Tokugawa Shogunate. Also covers the historical setting and how Tsuneno’s life tells us more about life, especially the life of women, during this period of Japanese history.

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Japan’s Sakoku Period

In Our Time | 4 April 2013 | 0h 42m | Listen Later | iTunes
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Japan’s Sakoku period, two centuries when the country deliberately isolated itself from the Western world. Sakoku began with a series of edicts in the 1630s which restricted the rights of Japanese to leave their country and expelled most of the Europeans living there. For the next two hundred years, Dutch traders were the only Westerners free to live in Japan. It was not until 1858 and the gunboat diplomacy of the American Commodore Matthew Perry that Japan’s international isolation finally ended. Although historians used to think of Japan as completely isolated from external influence during this period, recent scholarship suggests that Japanese society was far less isolated from European ideas during this period than previously thought.

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The Making of Modern Japan

The Forum | 8 September 2018 | 0h 39m | Listen Later  | iTunes
From the mid-19th century, Japan transformed itself from feudal state to economic powerhouse at breakneck speed. The rebel samurai who seized power in 1868 removed an entire ruling elite, introduced national conscription and compulsory education, building a brand new society. Unpacks the origins of this transformation, and examines how it led to imperial expansion and the subsequent atrocities of World War II.

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