Wasps Are ‘Pests’ Worth Protecting

KERA’s Think | 16 September 2022 | 0h 35m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Seirian Sumner about her book Endless Forms: The Secret World of Wasps. Discusses the wild world of wasps, their diversity, complex social lives, and their critical role in nature, particularly as pest controllers.

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We Can’t Have Medical Progress Without Risk

KERA’s Think | 29 September 2021 | 0h 33m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Paul Offit about his book You Bet Your Life: From Blood Transfusions to Mass Vaccination, the Long and Risky History of Medical Innovation. Describes the history of the risks run and sacrifices made to progress the medical technologies and lifesaving therapies that we rely on.

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Why We Sweat

KERA’s Think | 2 August 2021 | 0h 31m | Listen Later | iTunes | Spotify
Interview with Sarah Everts about her book The Joy of Sweat: The Strange Science of Perspiration. Discusses the science of sweat, the many advantages it sweat confers and the industry built to fight our body’s natural function.

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Confessions of a Recovering Chess Addict

KERA’s Think | 21 August 2019 | 0h 47m | Listen Later
Interview with Sasha Chapin about his memoir All the Wrong Moves: A Memoir About Chess, Love, and Ruining Everything. Insightful throughout, with perspectives beyond chess on relationships, social skills, travel, psychology, decision making, talent versus 10,000 hours, and, of course, chess.

I’ve since read the book, which is beautifully well written. It reminded me of William Finnegan’s Barbarian Days, also a beautifully written memoir of growing up and relationships, but anchored on surfing rather than chess.

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The Evolution Of Human Violence

KERA’s Think | 12 February 2019 | 0h 48m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with anthropologist Richard Wrangham about the ideas in The Goodness Paradox: The Strange Relationship Between Virtue and Violence in Human Evolution. Draws on evolutionary evidence to suggest that as we domesticated ourselves, we reduced our tendency to reactive violence, whilst simultaneously retaining our capacity for organised violence.

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