The Journey of Munjed Al Muderis from Refugee to World Leading Surgeon

Big Ideas | 2 January 2020 | 0h 54m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Munjed Al Muderis about his journey from Iraqi refugee to world-famous orthopaedic surgeon. One hell of a story, with insights on the refugee experience, refugee policy, entitled medical culture, humanitarian work, and Iraq. Draws from his book Walking Free.

Notes from a Transplant Surgeon

RNZ – All Programmes | 26 February 2019 | 0h 21m | Listen Later
Interview with Joshua Mezrich about his book When Death Becomes Life: Notes from a Transplant Surgeon. A compelling account of the work, history and ethical issues of lifesaving organ transplants.

Adam Cifu on the Case for Being a Medical Conservative

EconTalk | 1 July 2019 | 1h 13m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with physician and author Adam Cifu about the ideas in The Case for Being a Medical Conservative. Cifu encourages doctors to appreciate the complexity of medical care and the reality that many medical techniques advocated by experts are not always beneficial or cost-effective. The conversation explores the challenges of finding reliable evidence to support medical interventions and the inherent uncertainty surrounding outcomes.

Pharmaceutical Freedom: Why Patients Have a Right to Self Medicate

Cato Daily Podcast | 12 January 2019 | 0h 17m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jessica Flanigan, laying out the case in her book Pharmaceutical Freedom: Why Patients Have a Right to Self Medicate.

A Mortgage for A Cure

a16z | 30 May 2019 | 0h 33m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with economist Andrew Lo discussing how to place an economic value on medicinal cures like gene and cell therapies, who should pay for what, and how. Also discusses the economics and risk of drug discovery and development and how markets might function more like biological systems than anything else.

Jacob Stegenga on Medical Nihilism

EconTalk | 1 April 2019 | 1h 18m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Jacob Stegenga about his book Medical Nihilism. Stegenga argues that many medical treatments either fail to achieve their intended goals or achieve those goals with many negative side effects. Stegenga argues that the approval process for pharmaceuticals, for example, exaggerates benefits and underestimates costs. He criticizes the FDA approval process for approving too many drugs that are not sufficiently helpful relative to their side effects. Stegenga argues for a more realistic understanding of what medical practice can and cannot achieve.

How Do We Know What Really Works in Healthcare?

Freakonomics Radio | 2 April 2015 | 0h 41m | Listen Later
A lot of conventional wisdom in medicine is nothing more than a hunch or wishful thinking. A new breed of data detectives is hoping to change that.