The Tortoise and the Hare

Revisionist History | 27 June 2019 | 0h 42m | Listen Later | iTunes
Malcolm Gladwell assesses the merits of educational pedigree as a means to identify legal talent before going on to propose his Grand Unified Theory for fixing higher education.

Puzzle Rush

Revisionist History | 20 June 2019 | 0h 38m | Listen Later | iTunes
The fourth season of Revisionist History starts with Malcolm Gladwell questioning the merits of examinations that deliberately rush the student. It turns out that ranking by ability is a function of how much thinking is rushed.

Malcolm Gladwell’s 12 Rules for Life

Revisionist History | 29 June 2018 | 0h 45m | Listen Later | iTunes
Malcolm Gladwell contrasts what is rational in sport with what we typically do, showing the role of disagreeableness in allowing us to engage with the world as it really is.

McDonald’s Broke My Heart

Revisionist History | 10 August 2017 | 0h 36m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Malcolm Gladwell on French fries. McDonald’s made the world’s greatest French Fry, then succumbed to public pressure to make it healthier. A salutary lesson in how little we know about dietary matters.

The Lady Vanishes

Revisionist History | 16 June 2016 | 0h 36m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Malcolm Gladwell uses a number of stories, notably the treatment of Australia’s first woman prime minister, to explain moral licensing – our habit of using a good deed to self-justify a bad one.

A Polite Word for Liar

Revisionist History| 31 May 2018 | 0h 39m | Listen Later  | iTunes
An early morning raid, a house-full of Nazis, the world’s greatest harmonica player, and a dashingly handsome undercover spy. Part 1 of a two-part exploration of memory and our naïve ideas about what memory is worth. Malcolm Gladwell shows us how we all reimagine the truth – so we cannot treat our memory as gospel. So good you just might listen twice.

Free Brian Williams

Revisionist History | 7 June 2018 | 0h 39m | Listen Later  | iTunes
The second part of Gladwell’s exploration of memory and our naïve ideas about what memory is worth. Part 1 showed that only a fool accepts the evidence of his own memory as gospel. This part shows how we’re all fools. Around 60% of our memories of flashbulb events like 911 are false, although we fervently believe them to be true.