Shona Minson on Children of Imprisoned Mothers

Social Science Bites | 2 October 2019 | 0h 21m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Shona Minson about her research on the effect on children of their mothers being imprisoned. Also describes her advocacy with a UK Parliamentary enquiry, which led to new guidelines aimed at strengthening female offenders’ family and other relationships.

Note that NZ Māori women are, per capita, the most imprisoned indigenous women in the world.

Michelle Baddeley on Social Herding

Social Science Bites | 2 February 2017 | 0h 15m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with economist Michelle Baddeley discussing social herding, which often follows from an information imbalance, real or perceived, in which a person follows the wisdom of crowds. Touches on finance, neuroeconomics, groupthink, reputation and safety in numbers.

James Robinson on Why Nations Fail

Social Science Bites | 3 December 2018 | 0h 18m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with James Robinson, co-author of Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty. Considers and refutes traditional explanations for the inequality between rich and poor countries. Makes the case for inclusive institutions being critical to creating economic success.

Gregory Clark on Using Names to Measure Social Mobility

Social Science Bites | 1 April 2014 | 0h 19m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with economist Gregory Clark, author of The Son Also Rises: Surnames and History of Social Mobility. Describes how inferences about social mobility can be drawn from the distribution of surnames amongst elites in societies over many centuries. Discusses the implications for social policy if social status is highly heritable.