The Challenger Disaster

Time to Eat the Dogs | 24 May 2024 | 0h 46m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Adam Higginbotham about his book Challenger: A True Story of Heroism and Disaster on the Edge of Space. Discusses the history of the Space Shuttle program and the decisions that made the Challenger explosion almost inevitable.

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How Does the Webb Telescope Change the Search for Exoplanets?

Time to Eat the Dogs | 4 October 2022 | 0h 33m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Hannah Wakeford backgrounding the Webb Telescope and its significance for the study of exoplanets: planets orbiting suns in other solar systems.

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Do You See Ice?

Time to Eat the Dogs | 5 June 2021 | 0h 29m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Karen Routledge about her book, Do You See Ice?: Inuit and Americans at Home and Away. Discusses Baffin Island’s Inuit community as it came into contact with western whalers and explorers in the nineteenth century. Even though the Inuit worked closely with outsiders, their views of the Arctic world, their ideas about the meaning of home, even their views of time itself remained different.

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Pacific Exploration, Botany, and Revolution

Time to Eat the Dogs | 5 May 2020 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Edwin Rose about his paper Publishing Nature in the Age of Revolutions: Joseph Banks, Georg Forster, and the Plants of the Pacific. Discusses Joseph Banks and Georg Forster, naturalists on James Cook’s expeditions, and how political ideas shaped the way these specimens were understood back in Europe.

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Searching for Life Beyond Earth

Time to Eat the Dogs | 27 December 2019 | 0h 30m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Claire Isabel Webb about the search for extraterrestrial life and the different strategies used by astronomers and exobiologists to look for it.

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The British Expeditionary Literature of Africa

Time to Eat the Dogs | 7 May 2019 | 0h 30m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Adrian Wisnicki about the British expeditionary literature of the late 1800s. Argues that Western explorers of Africa used the pre-existing knowledge of Africans and the people who traded with them. Draws on ideas in Fieldwork of Empire, 1840-1900: Intercultural Dynamics in the Production of British Expeditionary Literature.

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