Pacific Exploration, Botany, and Revolution

Time to Eat the Dogs | 5 May 2020 | 0h 28m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Edwin Rose about his paper Publishing Nature in the Age of Revolutions: Joseph Banks, Georg Forster, and the Plants of the Pacific. Discusses Joseph Banks and Georg Forster, naturalists on James Cook’s expeditions, and how political ideas shaped the way these specimens were understood back in Europe.

Hawaiian Exploration of the World

Time to Eat the Dogs | 22 January 2020 | 0h 32m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with David Chang about his book The World and All the Things Upon It: Native Hawaiian Geographies of Exploration. Discusses the history of indigenous Hawaiians (Kanaka Maoli) as explorers and geographers of the world.

Searching for Life Beyond Earth

Time to Eat the Dogs | 27 December 2019 | 0h 30m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Claire Isabel Webb about the search for extraterrestrial life and the different strategies used by astronomers and exobiologists to look for it.

The British Expeditionary Literature of Africa

Time to Eat the Dogs | 7 May 2019 | 0h 30m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Adrian Wisnicki about the British expeditionary literature of the late 1800s. Argues that Western explorers of Africa used the pre-existing knowledge of Africans and the people who traded with them. Draws on ideas in Fieldwork of Empire, 1840-1900: Intercultural Dynamics in the Production of British Expeditionary Literature.

New Insights About Darwin

Time to Eat the Dogs | 16 April 2019 | 0h 32m | Listen Later | iTunes
Interview with Alistair Sponsel about his book Darwin’s Evolving Identity: Adventure, Ambition, and the Sin of Speculation. Delves into the forces that shaped Darwin’s thinking on evolution.

Searching for Hobbits

Time to Eat the Dogs | 17 November 2018 | 0h 32m | Listen Later  | iTunes
Interview with Paige Madison about her work at the Liang Bua cave in Indonesia, where she studies the new hominid species Homo floresiensis, as well as the team of researchers who have worked at the cave for years, sometimes for generations.