How the Navy Learned to Fight

ChinaTalk | 18 January 2024 | 1h 53m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Trent Hone discussing how the US Navy evolved over the first half of the 20C from a bunch of unschooled violent sailors who couldn’t shoot straight to the world’s largest and most technologically advanced fighting force. Considers the organizational design lessons we can learn from this transformation. Draws from his books Learning War and Mastering the Art of Command.

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Luke Glowacki: Is Human Warfare Ancient or Recent?

The Dissenter | 22 December 2023 | 1h 44m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Luke Glowacki about the evolution of war, and human cooperation. Discusses the main sources used to study the origins of war including animal models, archaeological evidence, and contemporary traditional societies; the myth that ancestral populations did not have anything to fight over or were too egalitarian to wage war, and also the myth that nomadic societies did not make peace; the deep-rooters and the shallow-rooters, the best evidence and arguments from both sides, and the epistemic and moral implications of the debate; large-scale cooperation in small-scale societies, and the main costs and benefits of intergroup cooperation and aggression; and whether peace is easy to maintain, and the role of key individuals in coalitional conflict.

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The Vietnam War: The My Lai Massacre with Marshall Poe

Aspects of History | 9 December 2023 | 1h 10m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Marshall Poe about his book The Reality of the My Lai Massacre. Discusses the build-up, the massacre of Vietnamese civilians by US troops in the village of My Lai, the events of that day, the cover-up, and why it happened.

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Andrew Roberts – Leading Historian on Warfare from Napoleon to Ukraine

Dwarkesh Podcast | 22 November 2023 | 1h 18m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Andrew Roberts about his books. Discusses Churchill the applied historian; Napoleon the startup founder; why Nazi ideology cost Hitler WW2; drones, reconnaissance, and other aspects of the future of war; Iraq, Afghanistan, Korea, Ukraine, & Taiwan.

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Rachel Chrastil on the Franco-Prussian War

History Extra | 1 July 2023 | 0h 40m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Rachel Chrastil about her book Bismarck’s War: The Franco-Prussian War and the Making of Modern Europe. Discusses the Franco-Prussian War, which Prussia quickly won, but which left consequences that played out over the following century. Covers Bismarck’s leadership, the Paris Commune and why it fell, whether Prussian victory made German unification inevitable, and whether the French desire for revenge contributed to the First World War.

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Peter Wilson on the Military History of the German-Speaking Peoples

School of War | 11 April 2023 | 0h 42m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Interview with Peter Wilson about his book Iron and Blood: A Military History of the German-Speaking Peoples since 1500. Discusses Germany, Germans, and German speakers at war, covering The Holy Roman Empire, The Thirty Years War, the Treaty of Westphalia, Prussia’s emergence, Bismarck, and the World Wars.

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Economic Warfare: Implications for Sanctions Today

ChinaTalk | 8 March 2023 | 1h 03m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Part 2 of an interview with Nick Mulder about his book The Economic Weapon. Discusses why the Great Depression made importing commodities cheaper, and how that affected Germany’s and Japan’s protectionism; the difference between autarky and autarchy; whether Kim Jong-un’s North Korea could survive a full-on fuel embargo today by using Nazi-era technology; “temporal claustrophobia” and what it has to do with Japan siding with the Axis; parallels between the “ABCD circle” (America, Britain, China, Dutch East Indies) and the semiconductor export controls today; why having an empire was a liability for Britain; what sanctions had to do with the Czechoslovaks – even with a larger army – falling to the Nazis; how the blockades of WWI differed from WWII; and what lessons pro-decouplers should learn from this history of sanctions.

 

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Economic Warfare: A History

ChinaTalk | 3 March 2023 | 1h 20m | Listen Later | Podcasts | Spotify
Part 1 of a podcast with Nick Mulder about his book The Economic Weapon: The Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War. Discusses the recent advent of the use of sanctions; why Europeans were reluctant to employ blockades and sanctions in the early 20C, and how their thinking evolved through two world wars; how Wilson’s notion of “moral sanctions” and decision to keep blockades in place after the war were important to the development of sanctions, especially during the interwar period; the League of Nations’ efforts to establish a “positive sanctions” fund, and why the concept never took off; why Hoover is underrated; and when and why Italy almost fought a war against Germany over Austria.

 

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